CompTIA A+ 220-1002 Exam Dumps, Practice Test Questions

100% Latest & Updated CompTIA A+ 220-1002 Practice Test Questions, Exam Dumps & Verified Answers!
30 Days Free Updates, Instant Download!

CompTIA 220-1002 Premium Bundle
$69.97
$49.99

220-1002 Premium Bundle

  • Premium File: 252 Questions & Answers. Last update: May 30, 2023
  • Training Course: 104 Video Lectures
  • Study Guide: 2287 Pages
  • Latest Questions
  • 100% Accurate Answers
  • Fast Exam Updates

220-1002 Premium Bundle

CompTIA 220-1002 Premium Bundle
  • Premium File: 252 Questions & Answers. Last update: May 30, 2023
  • Training Course: 104 Video Lectures
  • Study Guide: 2287 Pages
  • Latest Questions
  • 100% Accurate Answers
  • Fast Exam Updates
$69.97
$49.99

Download Free 220-1002 Exam Questions

File Name Size Download Votes  
File Name
comptia.actualtests.220-1002.v2023-04-05.by.george.329q.vce
Size
1.3 MB
Download
107
Votes
1
 
Download
File Name
comptia.braindumps.220-1002.v2021-12-28.by.amber.340q.vce
Size
434.37 KB
Download
572
Votes
1
 
Download
File Name
comptia.prep4sure.220-1002.v2021-09-08.by.zala.290q.vce
Size
961.61 KB
Download
674
Votes
1
 
Download
File Name
comptia.testking.220-1002.v2021-05-28.by.cameron.252q.vce
Size
855.37 KB
Download
775
Votes
1
 
Download
File Name
comptia.test-king.220-1002.v2021-03-26.by.zachary.222q.vce
Size
856.26 KB
Download
861
Votes
2
 
Download
File Name
comptia.testking.220-1002.v2021-01-12.by.jude.189q.vce
Size
780.51 KB
Download
939
Votes
2
 
Download

CompTIA 220-1002 Practice Test Questions, CompTIA 220-1002 Exam Dumps

With Examsnap's complete exam preparation package covering the CompTIA 220-1002 Practice Test Questions and answers, study guide, and video training course are included in the premium bundle. CompTIA 220-1002 Exam Dumps and Practice Test Questions come in the VCE format to provide you with an exam testing environment and boosts your confidence Read More.

Book Chapter 9 - Implementing Mass Storage

6. Formatting in Action

All these episodes talking about file systems and formatting are You know what, let's put this all together and let's get down and do a little formatting. You know what, I might do a little more partitioning too. So in this episode, what I want to do is get a little bit practical. So we're going to do mainly formatting, but also a little partitioning into two different operating systems. I'm going to do this in Windows and in a Linux distribution called Ubuntu. So let's go ahead and get started with Windows 10. Here I am on Windows Ten and I am going to launch Disk Management, the tool we use to work with our storage. Now, the first thing that's going to be popped up here is what we call an initialised disk. What's happening? And this is a Windows thing. Windows is saying, hey, wait a minute, this is a disc I've never seen before. What do you want me to do with it? So you're basically going to say, "I'm going to join this disc to this system." So what we're going to do is we're going to useGPT for the drive itself and we're just going to hit okay. And we've now gone through the process of initialization. From now on, if I use this drive anywhere, if I pull it out and take it to another system,when we plug it in, it's going to go, hey,wait a minute, this is not one of mine. And it'll put up a geoid value and it'll say, do you want to use it? And we can just go ahead and initialise it, but it kind of gives us a little extra cushion. OK, so what I've got here is a hard drive that I've installed. It's completely blank. So I'm going to go ahead and I'm going to create a volume. So this is actually the partitioning part. I'm going to just make it one big partition. Now that was the partition here. We can assign a drive letter to it. Now, while we're in here and we're setting up the filesystem, I want you to see a couple of things. Number one, we're not limited to whatever Microsoft says, so we can go ahead and give it a different letter if we wanted to. Also in Windows, we can mount it to an NTFS folder. So if I wanted to, I don't even have to give this volume a drive letter. I can actually make it part of a folder on an existing partition. So by doing something like that, instead of it becoming a drive letter, I can actually make it a folder in a preexisting partition. But I don't like to do that. I like my drive letters. And if for some reason I just didn't want to do anything right now, I could just go ahead and skip that. But let's just leave it as e. Here's where the formatting kicks in. First of all, we can say, do not format this drive. I don't know why somebody would partition and not format, but I guess there are some reasons. And here's where we can actually do the formatting. Within Windows, it's going to be NTFS, or we could do Xfat. There is no good reason to use Xfat on an actual drive itself. I like the power of NTFS, so we're just going to select NTFS. By the way, this can actually change depending on how big of a partition you're trying to format. If it's really small, fat 32 can still show up. Now, the next one is what we call an allocation unit size. Basically, they're saying, how big are the block allocation units? Sometimes we hear the term "cluster." Unless there's a very specific reason to do otherwise, we always use the defaults. I have never had to mess with this setting in 30 years, other than maybe once or twice. So that shows you how often I do anything other than the default. And the last is a volume label. A volume label is kind of like a sign in front of the room that tells you what it's for. And I can put something like,say it's a data partition. I can put the word "data" in there. You can type anything you want here. Now, the next one is to perform a quick format. When you do a format, two things take place. Number one, you're creating the file allocation table and the initial, what we call the root directory. But you're also going through and checking each one of the blocks to make sure that they're in good order. If you want to make your format really,really fast, you can keep this checked. What it will do is build the data structures, but it won't actually test them. Do that at your own risk. Personally, I'm going to keep that unchecked on a drive that I really want to keep and use for a long time. However, when you're teaching stuff like this,it makes the format really, really quick. And the last one is to enable file and folder compression. For right now, we're going to leave that alone. We can always do it later. So this is if I want to be able to compress and make it smaller. In today's world of massive terabyte drives, that's not nearly as attractive as it used to be. But it is an option if you want to squish your data up. So we'll leave it unchecked. So now it's going through and checking everything. This is what you really want to do. It's your chance to go back and we hit it. And because we did a quick format,you'll see that it's already done. If we were doing a non-quick format,this process could take a few minutes. Maybe. Depending on a really big drive, it could take up to ten minutes. So be aware that that quick format can be handy. But remember, you're not checking your blocks. If there's a bad one, you're going to have trouble. OK, so what I want to do now is let's do this all over again. Except that in this case, what I wanted was something we all know and love: a regular old thumb drive. So I got myself a little thumb drive right here. Let's go through this process. Except this time, let's talk about formatting removable media like thumb drives. I can see the USB drive here,so let's take a look at this. So if we open it up, there are some files on here. I think these are pictures of me on my Gatorland vacation. So I've already put a copy of these into the cloud. So let's go ahead and go through the process of actually formatting it. Simply right-click on the removable media to format it. And we've got a format option right here. Now take a look at what your options are here. Windows is going to determine the file system based on the size of the actual device. This is actually a tiny thumb drive. It's only a one gig thumb drive. So we actually get the old schoolFat 16 as an option here. We can do old school Fat 16, Fat 32, ex-Fat or NTFS. The reason you get so many options with removable media is simply because they all have these different sizes. The smaller they are, the less overhead in file allocation tables you want. So, especially for an older thumb drive like this, something like old school Fat 16 is absolutely fine. We're never going to have to worry about having huge capacities or massive files because it's only a 1 GB thumb drive. So often in these situations, I'm simply going to accept whatever Microsoft puts up as a default. It's always going to be the most efficient choice. So I'm going to go with theFat, which is actually Fat 16. But you can see, I can still do a volume label if I want and I can do a quick format if I want. So let me go ahead and run this. It's like, oh, wait, there's stuff on there. Go ahead and get rid of it. So formatting, particularly on little thumb drives, is a great way to just straight up erase them. What a convenient way to just go in. It's going to wipe out any folders,it's going to wipe out any files. And in one shot, I've got a nice clean thumb drive. I don't know about you, but I keep like 45 thumb drives around. There's nothing more irritating than pulling one out and suddenly going, "What are these files?" So you can do formatting on thumb drives. You have the same settings as you do with a hard drive. And by the way, this doesn't make any difference whether I'm going with old-school hard drives or a NVMe SSD. All the mass storage is all going to work the same way. It makes no difference if their technology is behind it. Okay, that was fun. So what I want to do is basically repeat this process one more time, except this time I'm going to use Linux. Now keep in mind, I've got a copy of Ubuntu Linux here and there are about 400 different tools that allow you to partition and format graphically. There are a lot of other ways to do it from the command prompt, but we'll save that for command prompt episodes. The important thing here is I've picked a fairly arbitrary one. I like it when you do this. You might have a different choice. Let's do this all over again, but this time in Ubuntu. Here I am in Ubuntu. Now, the particular tool I'm using here is called discs It comes with Ubuntu by default. I like it, but it works great. So basically what I have here is you can see I've got two hard drives on this system. This is my second drive and it's blank. What I've done is I've put a partition on it, but now I want to go ahead and format it. So here I'm just going to click Format Partition and I can give it any kind of name I want. It's called Data again, and interestingly enough, this is how I would do any race. So basically it's saying if there's data on it, you have to overtly click this or else it won't erase anything. So it's like a safety feature, but it's also a little irritating. Now take a look at what our choices are here in this particular version of Ubuntu. We do Ext Four. There's a way to do ext three but I wouldn't be able to do it with this particular application and to be honest with you, if I had ext four, there's no motivation to do ext. It has a password protect function that reallyhas nothing to do with formatting; it's just a convenient time to do it. But also look at some of my other choices. I can format this as NTFS again. The NTFS filesystem is very popular even with alternative operating systems. I could even do an old school Fat Fat 16, although I could come up with no reason why I would want to do that and then I could go through a manual process which I'm going to ignore. So for this particular one, I'm just going to say make it Ext Four. Warning, warning. Warning wants to make sure it's me before we do this, and I have now set up a 22 gigabyteext formatted drive and it will show up on my Linux system as dev SDB, so you've just seen two totally different operating systems formatting a big partition. The big deal here is that it's no big deal as long as you understand the filesystems for the operating system you're going to use. The processes are pretty much the same. It's just a matter of going through the steps, finding the right tool, and making the right format for you.

7. Dynamic Disks

Master boot record partitions have been around for a very long time. And to be honest, Microsoft was getting a little bit frustrated with the limitations of MBR. GPT had not yet been invented. So Microsoft came along and came out with their own. I guess we could look at these as extensions to harddrive functionalities, which they labelled under dynamic disks. A dynamic disc is unique to Microsoft Windows. You won't see it in any other operating system, but it allows us to do some really cool stuff that you can't do with a regular or what they call a basic disk. With a basic disk, you really can't do much. With a dynamic disk, you can do stuff like shrinkit, you can span it across multiple physical drives, and a lot of extra fun features like that. So to make this work, you have to set your drives to dynamic. So take a look at these drives I've got right here. If you take a look, you'll see that they are set as basic drives. Now, to make them dynamic, you just right-click on them and you say "convert to dynamic disk" and it will let us get both of those at once. So by converting these to dynamic disk, it doesn't look like much on the screen, but it's a window that you want a lot of extra features. So oh, by the way, if you're doing this in Windows Ten, the features I'm about to show you will even show up if it's set to basic because Microsoft will just change it to dynamic for you. So you still have to change it to Dynamic to see this stuff. Okay, let's take a look. So if I right click here,I can still make regular volumes. That's easy. Let's go ahead and just make one little quick volume. I'm going to make it half that size. So I've just made a regular old simple volume. Notice that when it's in a dynamic drive,it gets a different little border color. Now, because it's dynamic, I can do some fun stuff. For example, if I want to, I can extend the volume because I have extra space left on this drive. I can just go and say, "extend the volume." We only want to work with that disc one, and he'll go ahead and stretch it out for us. This is actually pretty cool. And a lot of times, especially if people have gone ahead and they've partitioned the drive into lots of volumes, they suddenly don't want all the drive letters, they just want like a big D drive or something like that. It's not an uncommon thing at all to delete some volumes out and just stretch that one volume. And here's the nice part. Any data in that volume you're extending is not touched. It's in perfect order. Now we can go the other direction as well. I can right click on this and I can shrink the volume. Now, when you're shrinking a volume, that means you're going to make it smaller. So Windows queries the volume and the first thing he's going to check is how much of it is unused. So he doesn't want to stomp on your data. So he'll give you and here's the setting. How much can you shrink it on this particular one? He can really shrink it really small. So I'm going to go ahead and let him do that shrink and watch what happens. Now, if you take a look at these numbers, you'll see it was a huge shrink. Windows is very careful about your data when you start messing with these volumes. And that's about all he feels that he can safely shrink on that particular volume. The nice part is that we can go through the shrinking process and all your data will be intact. It just allows you to do a little shrinking. Now, I do a lot of extending. I don't do much shrinking, but you have to be in a dynamic disc to pull that off. So the next thing I want to take a look at is how we can work with multiple drives. So, going back to my two drives,I can do some fairly interesting stuff. For example, one of the things I can do is what's called a spanned volume. A spanned volume simply means you can taketwo or more and make it look, smell, and taste like a single drive. So you'll see, I've selected two discs and I hit Next, which gets a drive letter. It gets formatted. See, I forgot to turn on Dynamic. That's what that screen was about. So he turned it to "dynamic" for me. And now I have what's known as a spanned drive. Now that you've seen a span drive, never do it. A span drive basically takes two drives. It fills up one drive and then starts filling up another drive. The only time a span drive will save you is if you've got one hard drive that you've filled up and you're like, what am I going to do? You can plug another drive in, span it to your existing drive, and at least you have a temporary fix until you can get a proper big hard drive. Then go ahead and put that in there. The reason spanning is bad is because you now have two points of failure. If either one of those dies, you've lost everything. So use span as an emergency feature, not as something that you want to do on an ongoing basis. All right, now that was fun. Let's see what else I could do with two drives here. Now I have two drives again. Now watch what I'm going to do this time. What I'm going to do is I'm going to stripe the volumes. So I need two drives to do this. So let me select the two I like playing with and hit Next. What's happened here is it's not a span. It's a stripe. What's taking place is that we have two drives that act as one drive. They literally work hand in hand with each other. We call this raid zero. When you get into our Raid episodes, the idea behind striping is that it allows us to save data quickly because we can go between two drives. The downside is, again, if you lose either drive, you've lost everything. Striping is a bit of a problem. It does increase speed. But there is a way we could create redundancy where you can make an extra copy, and that's called mirroring. We can do that with dynamic disc two. Let's go ahead and select the drives I want. I'm going to use one. And two, get a drive letter. Just as always, we're going to do a quick format. Now, the important thing with mirrored drives is that you're literally making the same copy on each drive. If either drive dies, you'll get an error screen and dismantling, but you'll still be able to access that drive. Now, a couple of things to be careful about here when you're stripping. Let's say I'm musing small numbers here because it's easy. I've got a 250 gigabyte drive. When we stripe them, we now have a 100 gigabyte drive. When you mirror, you're making a copy. And if you have 250 gigabyte drives and you mirror them, you're still just going to have a 150 gigabyte drive. It's just making two copies of everything to protect you. Dynamic discs were an incredible little feature that came along in our GPT world. There are a couple of best practises that Microsoft recommends. Number one, they recommend that your Windows boot drive never be dynamic. Always keep your boot drive itself as a basic drive. Also, if you're going to be working with all of these features, you probably want to go ahead now and set it to GPT. It's not that a regular MBR drive can't do as he saw it, it just did. But with GPT, you get a little bit more feature set and a little bit more flexibility. And last, and here's the big thing to remember when it comes to dynamic drives, Dynamic drives are easy to be created.Simply switch to dynamic drive. But if you go from a dynamic drive back to a basic drive,it'll do it, but you're going to lose all your data. So choose your usage of dynamic drives carefully.

8. Software RAID in Storage Spaces

Hardware Raid may be a better option when you have a lot of money and when you need a lot of power. But today's, increasingly more powerful CPUs make software raid a real option. And by software raid, I simply mean you're letting the operating system handle the raid for you. Now, in this example, I'm going to use Windows, and I'm going to show you a couple of ways that Windows does Raid. The first place to look is dismanagement. Here I have a Disk Management, and in this particular case, I've installed a bunch of drives. Now, you will notice that their capacities are really small. They're only like 50GB. I'm doing that on purpose because I want things to move quickly. But if you take a look, you'll see I've got 12345 drives installed. Now, Windows by itself is a little limited in what it can do Raidwise.But the two things it can do quite easily are Raid Zero and Raid One. So for example, I'm going to pick this top one. And if I pick a striped volume and I have at least one other drive, it's going to go ahead and make a classic Raid Zero between those two drives. Now, the thing you need to understand is that Windows is doing all this for us. So Windows actually sees all the drives. Yes, it gets one drive letter, but it still sees all the drives. Now, I've got some more drives, so let's do it again. Except this time I'm going to do a mirror. So this time I'm going to do discs three and four. It wants to convert stuff to a dynamic disc for me. And you'll see, I've now made myself a mirror volume so Windows by itself can handle both Raid Zero and Raid One. Now, I want to throw in a little teaser here for you. It's a little bit beyond average, but still kind of cool. If I look on this last drive, you'll see it says there's a new Raid Five volume. Basically, there are ways to do Raid Five, but you have to have more advanced versions of Windows than the Windows Pro I've got it right here. So when we're talking about Windows, you're really talking about two levels of Raid: Raid Zero and Raid One. But we've done this all in software. Let me go ahead and clear this out real quick. And I'm going to close disc management and I want to show you something called Storage Spaces. Storage Spaces is an incredible software raid tool built into most copies of Microsoft Windows. The idea behind Storage Spaces is that they give you a lot more flexibility. Yes. You can do Raid Five here. In fact, you can do more than that. Let me show you how Storage Spaces works. So when we come into Storage Spaces, the first thing it's going to say is, "Create a new pool and storage space." So I'm going to say yes, let's do that. Now, keep in mind I have five drives in here that I want to work with for our first timeout. Let's go ahead and just pick two drives. And this will create a pool. A pool is kind of like an array. It is a pre-assigned group of people who will work together to do something. We'll give it a name; call it something clever. We begin by assigning it a drive letter. And now here's the interesting part for this guy. What we can do is, we have four choices here. Number one is simple, and that's just JBOD. It makes a bunch of disks. Second is that we can do a two-way mirror, and that is a classic mirror. So let's go ahead and do that. Now, as we make a classic mirror, one of the things that's actually kind of interesting, I want to show you this is it'll.Sit there and say what the pool capacity is going to be. And now it says, "How big do you want it to be?" Well, that doesn't make sense. It should be defined by the size of the drives. So I have two, in this case, just using 50 gigabyte drives. If they're mirrored, then I should have about a 50 gigabyte mirror because they're making two copies. But what it says here is that the total pool capacity is 98. Nine. This is a gigabytes versus gigabytes problem. But the maximum size is shown as half that. But now watch this. I'm going to make it 48 terabytes and it works. That doesn't make any sense. I have two hard drives with a total capacity of 100 GB. And I just made this up to 48 terabytes. This is one of the cool features of Storage Spaces. Storage spaces will go. We'll get it at any size you want. And as we begin to fill this, if you start to fill up the drives, it'll go. You better put some new drives in here real quick because I've told them we've got 48 terabytes and I'm going to need some more space. So storage spaces could be absolutely incredible in terms of their flexibility. So what we've done here is, with two drives,we've gone ahead and we've made ourselves a mirror. I'm going to create a new pool in a storage space. Now, Raid Five requires a minimum of three drives, and I've got them here. So I'm going to create the pool. Now what I have to do is select parity. In Microsoft lingo, parity is raid five. So in this case, I've got three drives for a total of about 150GB. And the equivalent of one of these drives is spread across all three of these. If I wanted to, I could make this bigger,but I'm just going to leave it alone. I've gone ahead and created a Raid Five array. So from five drives, I've made a mirrored pair and I've made a raid five array. So let's go and take a look at how this all looks in dismantling. When we look at dismantling, it looks very similar to what we would see with a hardware array in that dismantling only sees the array's results as one big drive. So storage spaces kind of hide all this from dismanagement. Now those are fun, but probably the coolest one that I like when it comes to storage space is what they call a three-way mirror. In order for this to work, I need five blank drives. So let me clear that out. Then we'll build a pool. Now that I've got all of those previous pools deleted, I'm going to go ahead and make a new pool here and here's all my drives back. I need all five of them to do what I'm about to do. So let's create a pool and this time I'm going to select a three-way mirror. "Threeway Mirror" is Microsoft's proprietary raid. Nobody really knows how it works, and Microsoft isn't telling anybody, but it has some incredible features to it. Normally, when we're working with Raid, it's really beneficial to have drives of the exact same size. For example, if I've got five 350 GB drives and I'm doing Raid Five, I get exactly 100 GB of storage. The other 50 is used for parity, but if I have 150 and on, the 50 is just ignored in essence. So that's always been a problem with traditional Raidsis that using different side drives actually causes wastage,but it doesn't with a three-way mirror. And Microsoft isn't telling us how it works, but it is absolutely fascinating. So I do a three-way mirror and it tells me my total capacity is five drives. That's about 250 gigs. And here it shows us the maximum size of 80, and we can change that to anything we want. We'll call it 100 terabytes. Okay, maybe that's a little too big. How about if we do 1000GB on 1 TB? Here we go. The cool part about the proprietary three-way mirror is that, even if we don't know how it works, it seems to take good advantage of different sized drives. It doesn't even care where they're plugged in. You can use external drives if you want. It's incredible. And the coolest part about all this is that I can lose two of any of these drives and I'm in absolutely great shape. The big takeaway for software raid is that it's really going to be up to your operating system to provide you with that capability. Windows, Linux, and even MacOS have software raid capabilities. The only downside is that with software raid you don't have a dedicated raid controller. So you're asking the CPU itself to handle all these raid duties. With a big, robust CPU, it's not that big of a deal. With a smaller CPU, it can really slow your system down. So the software rate is free. It comes with your OS, but it's a little bit slower. whereas hardware rates are much higher, but it keeps your system running fast and has those extra features.

9. Encrypting Mass Storage

I love my little laptop. It's absolutely fantastic. It's powerful. It does what I needed to do. Unfortunately, it's an incredibly portable device. And I'm notorious for leaving this at the back of Ubers and at people's kitchen tables, on trains and on airplanes. And that's a bit of a problem because I've got company secrets on here and I need to protect them. So in this episode, what I want to talk about is the concept of encryption. Now, what I'm talking about here when I say encryption, I'm talking about encrypting the storage devices that we have on our systems. So for me, there are really two storage devices I'm going to worry about right now. I've got the built-in SSD that's got Windows and some storage there. I have it divided into two partitions, and I also have a thumb drive with me. So for me, what I want to do is go through the process of encrypting these, so if I'm not around, then other people can't read them. Now, when we talk about how encryption works,there are two ways to do this. Then there's what we call disc based.Filebased means that there's some kind of software feature built into the operating system where you can pick a particular file or a particular folder and say, "Go ahead and encrypt this." Disk base encryption is some type of tool that is built into the operating system. And there could be a third party involved as well. And what you'll do is you'll go in and say, "I want the entire C drive encrypted," or "I want the entire drive encrypted," or "I want the entire thumb drive encrypted." So we have two very different ways of doing this. In Windows, we use the Encrypting File System, or EFS. EFS is actually built into the NT file system. It's built into NTFS, and as long as you format a particular partition with NTFS, you can use EFS. Other operating systems aren't quite as beautiful when it comes to file level encryption. With the Mac operating system, there's no built-in tool, although there are a number of excellent third-party products. And in Linux, there are so many that it's actually a little confusing. You pick one particular file level encryption, and it'll do whatever job you want to do. So we're going to go ahead and do this with Windows. So I'm going to go ahead and use the Encrypting File System on my laptop right here. Using an encrypted file system is trivial. Easy. All of my partitions on this laptop are formatted as NTFS, so I can go up to any file or folder and encrypt it. Now you can see I have this very secret companySecrets PDF here in the upper left hand corner. So I just right clicked on that. I select Properties, and now down here under Attributes, you'll see a little button called Advanced. Then I click Encrypt Contents to secure data, and all I have to do is hit OK and OK. Now, what is it asking now? It's like, "Well, wait a minute, you've got a lot of stuff in this folder." Do you want to encrypt this file as well as the parent folder, which means any other things that are in the desktop folder? Or do you want me to only encrypt the file? In this case, I'm going to say just the file, please. And as you can now see by that little lock, we have encrypted that PDF. Once I've set a file to be encrypted with EFS, every time I log in, it automatically unencrypts itself and it's instantly available to use once my system is shut down. Therefore, even if the system is on but someone else has signed in and is trying to get to it, it's totally encrypted and it's very, very protected. I am unaware of anybody, including law enforcement here in the United States, who's been able to crack the NTFS encrypting file system. At this point, you never know. So that's good. But sometimes I'm in a situation where I really want to encrypt something hard.And when I'm talking about this, I'm talking about how I want to lockdown an entire partition in such a way that it has super high level encryption and nobody can get to it. In that case, we're talking about having to use some type of disk-based encryption. Now, in the Windows world, we always turn to BitLocker. BitLocker is fabulous. It works great. With the MacOS We have something called a "file vault." And again, with Linux, we've got so many options. I'm not even going to try to go there. The Linux folks have all kinds of fun toys. So the important thing to understand about disc level encryption is that in order for this to work, we have to have some kind of key, some kind of lock. And what we have is something known as the Trusted Platform Module, or TPM. A TPM manifests as a chip that's plugged into a motherboard or soldered onto a motherboard. In the case of these laptops, And built into this chip is a very robust key, and without that key, you are never, ever going to unlock that thing. So if somebody even yanked the hard drive out of my system, it wouldn't have the key with it and it would be completely stopped dead in its tracks. So the first thing we have to do is make sure that we have the TPM turned on. Now, this is important. On a desktop system, the TPM module is often a separate product that we plug into the motherboard and then we go through and turn it on through our system setup. But again, with almost all laptops, they have a TPM module built in. So let's go into our system setup and make sure the TPM module is turned on. All right. So now I'm in my system setup and I'm just guessing, but I see a big tab that says security,and I'm looking for a trusted platform module. So I see an option here. I'm assuming it says security device support here. It's currently disabled. So let me go ahead and turn this on. Now, I get a lot of other stuff here. I can ignore all that. I've gone ahead and I've turned on TPM. Let's go ahead and save and reboot Windows. Well, that was easy. But now that we've got the TPM module turned on, let's go ahead and boot into Windows and let's fire up BitLocker. Okay, so I've started up BitLocker. It's in the control panel, so I just went and fired it up. Now what I'm about to try to do will fail if your TPM module is turned off or if you don't have a TPM module. So I'm going to go ahead and turn on BitLocker and make sure that I have a TPM module. If I didn't have one, I wouldn't have got to the screen. So what happens if the motherboard dies? What if my TPM module goes to smoke? Well, I can get a recovery key where I can plug the drive in to another system. And using this key, I can go ahead and log in and get my data back. So I'm going to go ahead and save it to a file. I can't put it on the same drive that I'm encrypting, but I've got my thumb drive plugged in, so I'm going to go ahead and save it to that. Now it's saying, do you want me to encrypt only where there are files stored, or do you want me to encrypt the entire drive? I'm going to go ahead and encrypt the entire drive. Now what it's trying to say is, do I want to do a new encryption mode because BitLocker has improved over the years, or do I want to keep an incompatible mode that would work with older drives? So if, for some reason, I had BitLockeron systems from earlier versions of Windows, I could go ahead and use compatible mode. This is my only one, so I'll hit next and I'm just going to go ahead and start encrypting it. Now, It also wants me to run a system check so I can verify that the recovery and encryption keys work. I know they'll work. So I'm just going to start the encryption process. So the encryption is going to take a while. I can close that. The encryption is still going on,so there's no problem there. The other thing I want to show you is this right here, BitLocker to go. BitLocker to Go is designed for removable media. And what's nice about BitLocker is that you don't need a TPM module. So I can turn on BitLocker here and this will run even if I don't have TPM. Now, because I don't have TPM, I'm going to have to use some kind of password or something. So I'm going to type in a really complicated password PM module.And again, it wants to save it some place.And in this particular case, I'm going to go ahead and just print it out and just put it in my OneNote account, and I've gone ahead and encrypted both my C drive and my thumb drive as well. Woo. We've got everything encrypted. I feel all cloak and dagger and safe now that I've got everything encrypted. With file-based tools like the Encrypting File System,we can encrypt individual files and folders. With disk-based tools like BitLocker, we can encrypt our entire drive. And with BitLocker to go, even our thumb drives are safe. Close you.

ExamSnap's CompTIA 220-1002 Practice Test Questions and Exam Dumps, study guide, and video training course are complicated in premium bundle. The Exam Updated are monitored by Industry Leading IT Trainers with over 15 years of experience, CompTIA 220-1002 Exam Dumps and Practice Test Questions cover all the Exam Objectives to make sure you pass your exam easily.

Comments (9)

Add Comment

Please post your comments about CompTIA Exams. Don't share your email address asking for 220-1002 braindumps or 220-1002 exam pdf files.

  • thomas2000
  • Singapore
  • Jan 20, 2023

@douglas, hi, the mocks for 220-1002 exam were very informative and useful. I did them after the a+ training, and this helped me gain the cut score. the real exam won’t be difficult if you’re well prepared, if not then it might give you much trouble...

  • albert1999
  • United States
  • Jan 18, 2023

i am delighted and happy for clearing my exam in the first attempt with an excellent score!! it wouldn’t have been the case if was not for the CompTIA 220-1002 practice questions and answers. they were extremely time saving and very useful in my preparation process. all the credit goes to the examsnap team))

  • vincent
  • Italy
  • Jan 18, 2023

@daniel, yes, the types of the questions you will find in sample tests for the A+ 220-1002 exam are very similar to those you’ll face in the real test. imo they are very good for consolidating your knowledge before the final exam. hope this helps

  • caroline
  • United Arab Emirates
  • Jan 16, 2023

Hello, everyone! Who’s passed the test with 220-1002 mocks provided here?What’s your opinion of them? And by the way, how was the real exam? Was it tough? Thanks for any assistance!

  • esther_SK
  • Puerto Rico
  • Jan 16, 2023

i was very impressed by these practice questions and answers for 220-1002 exam. i found detailed explanations for the answers and this definitely helped me pass the test. i look forward to taking many more cert exams with your help!

  • daniel
  • United Kingdom
  • Jan 16, 2023

hi guys, do the questions contained in these 220-1002 practice tests have similar format as the actual exam items?

  • armani
  • Thailand
  • Jan 15, 2023

I passed my exam yesterday. I succeeded in it thanks to the CompTIA A+ official training + free vce files taken from this platform. as for vce files, they gave me a great overview of the evaluated content without providing any outdated info. and they were so easy to comprehend! strongly recommend

  • judy
  • Malta
  • Jan 15, 2023

these dumps for 220-1002 exam were very helpful during my revision. they gave me an idea of the types of quizzes that are usually featured in the main assessment. i aced the test and i am not sure if i could have managed without these study resources!

  • douglas
  • Malta
  • Jan 14, 2023

Hello, everyone! Who’s passed the test with 220-1002 mocks provided here?What’s your opinion of them? And by the way, how was the real exam? Was it tough? Thanks for any assistance!

Add Comment

Purchase Individually

220-1002  Premium File
220-1002
Premium File
252 Q&A
$43.99 $39.99
220-1002  Training Course
220-1002
Training Course
104 Lectures
$16.49 $14.99
220-1002  Study Guide
220-1002
Study Guide
2287 Pages
$16.49 $14.99
UP

LIMITED OFFER: GET 30% Discount

This is ONE TIME OFFER

ExamSnap Discount Offer
Enter Your Email Address to Receive Your 30% Discount Code

A confirmation link will be sent to this email address to verify your login. *We value your privacy. We will not rent or sell your email address.

Download Free Demo of VCE Exam Simulator

Experience Avanset VCE Exam Simulator for yourself.

Simply submit your e-mail address below to get started with our interactive software demo of your free trial.

Free Demo Limits: In the demo version you will be able to access only first 5 questions from exam.