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350-401: Implementing Cisco Enterprise Network Core Technologies (ENCOR)

PDFs and exam guides are not so efficient, right? Prepare for your Cisco examination with our training course. The 350-401 course contains a complete batch of videos that will provide you with profound and thorough knowledge related to Cisco certification exam. Pass the Cisco 350-401 test with flying colors.

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Curriculum for 350-401 Certification Video Course

Name of Video Time
Play Video: CCNP Enterprise Certification
1. CCNP Enterprise Certification
11:00
Play Video: Topic
2. Topic
1:00
Play Video: 1.0 Architecture Part01
3. 1.0 Architecture Part01
12:00
Play Video: 1.0 Architecture Part02
4. 1.0 Architecture Part02
7:00
Play Video: WAN Overlay Technologies
5. WAN Overlay Technologies
9:00
Play Video: Qos
6. Qos
12:00
Play Video: LAN & WAN Design option
7. LAN & WAN Design option
10:00
Play Video: Multilayer Campus Design Part 01
8. Multilayer Campus Design Part 01
12:00
Play Video: Multilayer Campus Design Part 02
9. Multilayer Campus Design Part 02
11:00
Play Video: 1.1.b High availability techniques such as redundancy, FHRP, and SSO
10. 1.1.b High availability techniques such as redundancy, FHRP, and SSO
10:00
Play Video: 1.2 Analyze design principles of a WLAN deployment
11. 1.2 Analyze design principles of a WLAN deployment
5:00
Play Video: Controller-Based Architecture Overview
12. Controller-Based Architecture Overview
9:00
Play Video: WLC Best practices
13. WLC Best practices
5:00
Play Video: Best Practices Summary
14. Best Practices Summary
5:00
Play Video: On-Prem vs Cloud Deployment
15. On-Prem vs Cloud Deployment
8:00
Play Video: Add more cloud
16. Add more cloud
8:00
Play Video: 1.4 Cisco SDWAN
17. 1.4 Cisco SDWAN
5:00
Play Video: SDWAN Architecture
18. SDWAN Architecture
10:00
Play Video: SDWAN Components Controllers
19. SDWAN Components Controllers
8:00
Play Video: SDWAN Data plan Devices
20. SDWAN Data plan Devices
11:00
Play Video: 1.4b Traditional WAN vs SDWAN
21. 1.4b Traditional WAN vs SDWAN
5:00
Play Video: 1.5 Explain the working principles of the Cisco SD-Access solution
22. 1.5 Explain the working principles of the Cisco SD-Access solution
11:00
Play Video: LISP Locator ID and Separation Protocol
23. LISP Locator ID and Separation Protocol
15:00
Play Video: VxLAN Virtual Extension LAN
24. VxLAN Virtual Extension LAN
10:00
Play Video: DNA supported Hardware & Summary
25. DNA supported Hardware & Summary
5:00
Play Video: 1.6 Qos
26. 1.6 Qos
14:00
Play Video: Qos Design & Implementation Part01
27. Qos Design & Implementation Part01
16:00
Play Video: Qos Design & Implementation Part02
28. Qos Design & Implementation Part02
13:00
Play Video: Qos Design & Implementation Part03
29. Qos Design & Implementation Part03
6:00
Play Video: Wireless Qos
30. Wireless Qos
9:00
Play Video: 1.7 Catalyst 9300 Hardware walkthrough
31. 1.7 Catalyst 9300 Hardware walkthrough
5:00
Play Video: Catalyst 9300 ASIC details
32. Catalyst 9300 ASIC details
8:00
Play Video: CEF & Adjacency Table
33. CEF & Adjacency Table
11:00
Play Video: TCAM
34. TCAM
5:00
Name of Video Time
Play Video: Virtualization
1. Virtualization
2:00
Play Video: What is Server
2. What is Server
5:00
Play Video: What is Virtualization
3. What is Virtualization
9:00
Play Video: Types of Hypervisors
4. Types of Hypervisors
3:00
Play Video: Virtual Machine
5. Virtual Machine
7:00
Play Video: Hypervisor Architecture
6. Hypervisor Architecture
11:00
Play Video: Virtual Machine Installation
7. Virtual Machine Installation
10:00
Play Video: Virtual Machines Networking
8. Virtual Machines Networking
9:00
Play Video: VMware vSphere Port Group & vSS
9. VMware vSphere Port Group & vSS
11:00
Play Video: vSwitch0 or Standard Switch Lab
10. vSwitch0 or Standard Switch Lab
20:00
Play Video: Port Group Properties
11. Port Group Properties
9:00
Play Video: Introduction to Distributed Virtual Switch
12. Introduction to Distributed Virtual Switch
5:00
Play Video: Distributed Virtual Switch Walkthroug
13. Distributed Virtual Switch Walkthroug
9:00
Play Video: Create Distributed Port Group
14. Create Distributed Port Group
11:00
Play Video: Create new Distributed Virtual Switch
15. Create new Distributed Virtual Switch
15:00
Play Video: VRF
16. VRF
5:00
Play Video: GRE Generic Routing Encapsulation
17. GRE Generic Routing Encapsulation
6:00
Play Video: IPSEC
18. IPSEC
11:00
Play Video: VRF GRE IPSEC Lab Part 01
19. VRF GRE IPSEC Lab Part 01
13:00
Play Video: VRF GRE IPSEC Lab Part 02
20. VRF GRE IPSEC Lab Part 02
8:00
Play Video: VRF GRE IPSEC Verification
21. VRF GRE IPSEC Verification
3:00
Name of Video Time
Play Video: 3.1 Infrastructure
1. 3.1 Infrastructure
1:00
Play Video: Vlan & trunk Part01
2. Vlan & trunk Part01
12:00
Play Video: Vlan & trunk Part02
3. Vlan & trunk Part02
3:00
Play Video: DTP Dynamic Trunking Protocol
4. DTP Dynamic Trunking Protocol
10:00
Play Video: VTP VLAN Trunking Protocol
5. VTP VLAN Trunking Protocol
12:00
Play Video: VTP Lab 01
6. VTP Lab 01
4:00
Play Video: VTP Lab 02
7. VTP Lab 02
11:00
Play Video: Etherchannel theory
8. Etherchannel theory
12:00
Play Video: Etherchannel Lab
9. Etherchannel Lab
10:00
Play Video: RSTP Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol
10. RSTP Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol
18:00
Play Video: RSTP TCN
11. RSTP TCN
6:00
Play Video: RSTP Lab
12. RSTP Lab
17:00
Play Video: MST Multiple Spanning Tree theory
13. MST Multiple Spanning Tree theory
7:00
Play Video: MST Multiple Spanning Tree Lab
14. MST Multiple Spanning Tree Lab
9:00
Play Video: 3.2 OSPF Basics
15. 3.2 OSPF Basics
10:00
Play Video: OSPF LSA Types
16. OSPF LSA Types
10:00
Play Video: OSPF DR BDR & Lab
17. OSPF DR BDR & Lab
20:00
Play Video: OSPF Network Types Metric Passive-interface Theory
18. OSPF Network Types Metric Passive-interface Theory
11:00
Play Video: OSPF Network Types Metric Passive-interface Lab
19. OSPF Network Types Metric Passive-interface Lab
13:00
Play Video: OSPF Authentication & Virtual Link Theory
20. OSPF Authentication & Virtual Link Theory
3:00
Play Video: OSPF Authentication & Virtual Link Lab
21. OSPF Authentication & Virtual Link Lab
19:00
Play Video: OSPF Summary Area Types & Default Route 01
22. OSPF Summary Area Types & Default Route 01
12:00
Play Video: OSPF Summary Area Types & Default Route 02
23. OSPF Summary Area Types & Default Route 02
3:00
Play Video: Eigrp Overview & terminologies 001
24. Eigrp Overview & terminologies 001
6:00
Play Video: Eigrp Overview & terminologies 02
25. Eigrp Overview & terminologies 02
4:00
Play Video: Eigrp Packet types & Metric
26. Eigrp Packet types & Metric
10:00
Play Video: Eigpr Basics Lab
27. Eigpr Basics Lab
10:00
Play Video: Eigrp Passive-Interface & Auto-Summarization
28. Eigrp Passive-Interface & Auto-Summarization
20:00
Play Video: Eigrp Load-balancing stub Lab
29. Eigrp Load-balancing stub Lab
10:00
Play Video: Eigrp Authentication & Variance Lab
30. Eigrp Authentication & Variance Lab
18:00
Play Video: Border Gateway Protocol BGP
31. Border Gateway Protocol BGP
12:00
Play Video: BGP Basic Lab iBGP vs eBGP
32. BGP Basic Lab iBGP vs eBGP
8:00
Play Video: BGP Basic Lab iBGP vs eBGP Continue
33. BGP Basic Lab iBGP vs eBGP Continue
1:00
Play Video: BGP Neighbor & Synchronization
34. BGP Neighbor & Synchronization
6:00
Play Video: BGP Neighbor & Synchronization Lab
35. BGP Neighbor & Synchronization Lab
14:00
Play Video: BGP Route-Reflector Confederation & Peer-Groups
36. BGP Route-Reflector Confederation & Peer-Groups
11:00
Play Video: BGP Route-Reflector Confederation & Peer-Groups Lab
37. BGP Route-Reflector Confederation & Peer-Groups Lab
19:00
Play Video: BGP Best Path Selection
38. BGP Best Path Selection
11:00
Play Video: BGP Best Path Selection Lab
39. BGP Best Path Selection Lab
15:00
Play Video: BGP Best Path Selection Lab Continue
40. BGP Best Path Selection Lab Continue
8:00
Play Video: BGP AS-Prepend & MED
41. BGP AS-Prepend & MED
4:00
Play Video: Wireless Basics 01
42. Wireless Basics 01
10:00
Play Video: Wireless Basics 02
43. Wireless Basics 02
12:00
Play Video: Three Spread-Spectrum
44. Three Spread-Spectrum
9:00
Play Video: The 802.11 Amendments
45. The 802.11 Amendments
4:00
Play Video: Interference & Effects of Physical Objects
46. Interference & Effects of Physical Objects
9:00
Play Video: Antenna Characteristics
47. Antenna Characteristics
12:00
Play Video: Types of Wireless Networks
48. Types of Wireless Networks
8:00
Play Video: 802.11 Frame Format
49. 802.11 Frame Format
8:00
Play Video: 802.11 Frame Types
50. 802.11 Frame Types
6:00
Play Video: Client Scans for AP & Roaming
51. Client Scans for AP & Roaming
5:00
Play Video: Understanding Cisco Wireless Architectures
52. Understanding Cisco Wireless Architectures
6:00
Play Video: Control and Provisioning of Wireless Access Points ( CAPWAP)
53. Control and Provisioning of Wireless Access Points ( CAPWAP)
6:00
Play Video: Centralized wireless Network Architecture & Flexconnect Wireless Network Archite
54. Centralized wireless Network Architecture & Flexconnect Wireless Network Archite
7:00
Play Video: Implementing Controller-based Deployments
55. Implementing Controller-based Deployments
7:00
Play Video: Performing an Initial Setup
56. Performing an Initial Setup
9:00
Play Video: Understanding Controller Discovery
57. Understanding Controller Discovery
6:00
Play Video: Understanding L2 & L3 Roaming
58. Understanding L2 & L3 Roaming
6:00
Play Video: Troubleshooting WLAN Connectivity
59. Troubleshooting WLAN Connectivity
12:00
Play Video: 3.4 IP services NTP
60. 3.4 IP services NTP
7:00
Play Video: a NTA Lab
61. a NTA Lab
4:00
Play Video: b NTA Lab
62. b NTA Lab
3:00
Play Video: NAT & PAT theory
63. NAT & PAT theory
10:00
Play Video: NAT & PAT Lab
64. NAT & PAT Lab
16:00
Play Video: NAT & PAT Lab Continue GNS3
65. NAT & PAT Lab Continue GNS3
4:00
Play Video: Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP)
66. Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP)
11:00
Play Video: Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP) Lab
67. Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP) Lab
15:00
Play Video: VRRP Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol
68. VRRP Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol
6:00
Play Video: VRRP Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol Lab
69. VRRP Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol Lab
5:00
Play Video: Multicast Basic
70. Multicast Basic
8:00
Play Video: Multicast Protocol IGMP
71. Multicast Protocol IGMP
17:00
Play Video: Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM)
72. Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM)
6:00
Play Video: Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) Verification
73. Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) Verification
9:00
Name of Video Time
Play Video: Debug
1. Debug
7:00
Play Video: Conditional Debug
2. Conditional Debug
6:00
Play Video: PING
3. PING
19:00
Play Video: TraceRoute
4. TraceRoute
9:00
Play Video: SNMP Simple Network Mgmt Protocol
5. SNMP Simple Network Mgmt Protocol
5:00
Play Video: Cisco MIB & Versions of SNMP
6. Cisco MIB & Versions of SNMP
5:00
Play Video: SNMP Configuration
7. SNMP Configuration
7:00
Play Video: SNMP LAB
8. SNMP LAB
6:00
Play Video: SNMP Lab result
9. SNMP Lab result
2:00
Play Video: SNMP V1-3 Quick Revision
10. SNMP V1-3 Quick Revision
4:00
Play Video: Configure & Verify Syslog
11. Configure & Verify Syslog
9:00
Play Video: Understand Netflow
12. Understand Netflow
6:00
Play Video: Netflow Configuration
13. Netflow Configuration
12:00
Play Video: Flexible Netflow
14. Flexible Netflow
4:00
Play Video: Capture the Packet over Data Plan SPAN RSPAN ERSPAN
15. Capture the Packet over Data Plan SPAN RSPAN ERSPAN
3:00
Play Video: SPAN Lab
16. SPAN Lab
7:00
Play Video: Cisco IP SLA
17. Cisco IP SLA
11:00
Play Video: DNA Workflow & Assurance
18. DNA Workflow & Assurance
11:00
Play Video: DNA Assurance Lab
19. DNA Assurance Lab
16:00
Name of Video Time
Play Video: Section 05 Lines & Password
1. Section 05 Lines & Password
5:00
Play Video: Lines & Password Lab
2. Lines & Password Lab
9:00
Play Video: AAA Concepts
3. AAA Concepts
4:00
Play Video: Access & AAA
4. Access & AAA
10:00
Play Video: ISE Switch Configuration
5. ISE Switch Configuration
10:00
Play Video: ISE Switch Configuration_backup
6. ISE Switch Configuration_backup
10:00
Play Video: Router & ASA Configuration
7. Router & ASA Configuration
3:00
Play Video: Access Control List
8. Access Control List
14:00
Play Video: Standard Access Control List
9. Standard Access Control List
6:00
Play Video: Extended Access Control List
10. Extended Access Control List
8:00
Play Video: Control Plane Policy
11. Control Plane Policy
9:00
Play Video: Control Plane Policy Lab
12. Control Plane Policy Lab
7:00
Play Video: API & API Security
13. API & API Security
2:00
Play Video: API SDWAN 01
14. API SDWAN 01
10:00
Play Video: API SDWAN 02
15. API SDWAN 02
4:00
Play Video: API Security
16. API Security
8:00
Play Video: Section 5.4 Wireless Security
17. Section 5.4 Wireless Security
1:00
Play Video: Basics of Wireless LAN Security
18. Basics of Wireless LAN Security
8:00
Play Video: Wireless Client Authentication Method
19. Wireless Client Authentication Method
6:00
Play Video: Wireless Authentication Methods
20. Wireless Authentication Methods
8:00
Play Video: Wireless Privacy & Integrity
21. Wireless Privacy & Integrity
8:00
Play Video: 5.5 Welcome
22. 5.5 Welcome
1:00
Play Video: Components of Security Design Model
23. Components of Security Design Model
8:00
Play Video: Threat Defense & Endpoint Security
24. Threat Defense & Endpoint Security
7:00
Play Video: Reconnaissance using NMAP
25. Reconnaissance using NMAP
7:00
Play Video: Attack Public Network via Front Door
26. Attack Public Network via Front Door
11:00
Play Video: Defending via FirePower
27. Defending via FirePower
16:00
Play Video: Attack then Defending via FirePower IPS
28. Attack then Defending via FirePower IPS
10:00
Play Video: Next Generation Firewall
29. Next Generation Firewall
5:00
Play Video: TrustSec & MACsec 01
30. TrustSec & MACsec 01
7:00
Play Video: TrustSec & MACsec 02
31. TrustSec & MACsec 02
7:00
Play Video: 802.1X MAB WebAuth Easy Connect
32. 802.1X MAB WebAuth Easy Connect
11:00
Name of Video Time
Play Video: Python Basics 01
1. Python Basics 01
6:00
Play Video: Python Basics 02
2. Python Basics 02
8:00
Play Video: Python basic program to add nxapi feature
3. Python basic program to add nxapi feature
4:00
Play Video: Python basic program to add nxapi feature edit
4. Python basic program to add nxapi feature edit
5:00
Play Video: Construct Valid JSON
5. Construct Valid JSON
5:00
Play Video: Local Destination in JSON format
6. Local Destination in JSON format
9:00
Play Video: YANG
7. YANG
7:00
Play Video: What is NSO ?
8. What is NSO ?
7:00
Play Video: Edit the service model YANG model file
9. Edit the service model YANG model file
12:00
Play Video: Edit the service model XML template file
10. Edit the service model XML template file
8:00
Play Video: Test the service model
11. Test the service model
9:00
Play Video: API for vManage
12. API for vManage
1:00
Play Video: Cisco DNA Rest API
13. Cisco DNA Rest API
6:00
Play Video: Cisco DNA Rest API Use
14. Cisco DNA Rest API Use
5:00
Play Video: Embedded Event Management
15. Embedded Event Management
7:00
Play Video: Embedded Event Management Lab
16. Embedded Event Management Lab
7:00
Play Video: Agent vs Agentless Tools
17. Agent vs Agentless Tools
10:00

Cisco ENCOR 350-401 Exam Dumps, Practice Test Questions

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Cisco 350-401 Training Course

Want verified and proven knowledge for Implementing Cisco Enterprise Network Core Technologies (ENCOR)? Believe it's easy when you have ExamSnap's Implementing Cisco Enterprise Network Core Technologies (ENCOR) certification video training course by your side which along with our Cisco 350-401 Exam Dumps & Practice Test questions provide a complete solution to pass your exam Read More.

Virtualization

8. Virtual Machines Networking

This particular session is very important because we are going to start virtual machine networking, Networking, and there are so many nice terms that we should learn and know. So let's start this. Now you can see what the problem is. We have a mobile app. So, once you have the host and the hypervisor, we know we have the host and, on top of that, the operating system or the guest operating system. So I have a server host and a guest operating system. The problem here is, let me try to draw here. The problem here is that once you have a host and you have a guest operating system, the first problem is which software element should control the physical network adapter drive. So here you have your physical network adapted to the server. Who will control it, the hypervisor or the guest operating system? Obviously, the hypervisor must have control over it. But how? That's the first thing. The second thing is how communication should occur between the VM and the external resource. So now in this diagram, you can see that you have your VMs and you have your server as well. Now these servers may be connected with a switch.

So, for example, l two or l three switches, followed by a router or an external world. So now this VM will come because this VM has their virtual nick. So the virtual nick adapter will come to the server and then it will go to the outside. Here we have the diagram. In this diagram, we can see clearly how these VMs will go and communicate to the outside. This is nothing but south-to-south or north-south traffic. So how will this happen? This is the second point, the second challenge. The third challenge is how the hosts will communicate with each other. So inside that I may have, for example, 25 VMs. So how did this east to west traffic or east to west communication happen and who has control over this communication? correct?

So those are the questions. The solution that VMware came up with in early 2000 was that once we installed this particular host, this particular hypervisor, at that time you had a network standard switch. As a result, you have a host standard switcher Vs and a VR standard switch VSS. Once you have the VSS, you know that this particular VSS has a unique V switch. You can think of this as a switch in between. So now this is the switch and then this switch will control the east to west or north to south or south to north traffic etch. We also have some issues with this particular standard switch. So before going to that particular problem, let's see this particular diagram here. So here I clearly see that you have your physical infrastructure and if I try to analyses this with a switch.

You think you have one switch, but you actually have north. Just to analyses this particular diagram. Here you have two meanings: here you have a server, a virtual server. So here you have a virtual server and here you have, for example, an outside world route and domain. You can now consider this specific virtual switch or virtual standard switch that we used to study access ports in the Cisco domain. So access will end at ten, access will end at twenty, access villain 30, access will end at 40, etc. Then you have one interface that is going towards the router that is nothing but a trunk. So you can think at the moment that the trunk is nothing but your uplink going towards the external router domain. And then you have this access point with these access ports belonging to certain VMs. You can think of this as a port group. We'll learn about port groups in the upcoming section. But you think of this as a port group and you may have certain specific port groups as well as certain specific VM ports that may be used for management traffic, that may be used for fault tolerance, that may be used for V motion. So here you can see that the blue color is nothing but complete VM related ports. And there you have the uplink, or your physical interface. So here you have port groups related to management, port groups related to V motion, maybe port groups related to fault tolerance, et cetera. Then you have port groups related to test, port groups related to production. And this is over one host. So this is nothing but one and the same type of thing. That's a problem here.

So if you want to scale up the same type of port group with the same name, you have to create everything across. Say, for example, if you have 25 hosts and 25 Six services, then you have to go and create the same name throughout. And that's why we have evolved to the distributed virtual switch that we will discuss later on. But here you can see the production. Here you can see the test and port group. So the attributes have common properties or common properties inside the same group, a group of common properties, anything you can tell that's a support group. Then you have the motion, you have the management. So here you can see the uplink and you can see the downlink, or you can see the VM link. This is nothing but my VM link, and this is nothing but my uplink. Everything is defined within the port group, common property group, attribute group, or grouping of common property or common task items. So clearly you have said VM, one guest operating system, one guest operating system, two, three, and four. Four VMs, two of the VMs, are part of, for example, cells.

Two of the VMs are part of HR. So they belong to HR, they belong to sales. Like that, you can group the ports, you can connect with the virtual machines. all right? So you can analyses it like your normal Cisco world, also like this. But again, now at this time, we should understand that virtually what they look like. correct? We should understand that. Now, what is the issue we have when using the standard switching system in that you can see that the standard switch is created? So, while you're installing Six, your VSS is up and running.

Now, the problem here is that each switch on every Six must be created and configured individually. So you have to go create, go create, et cetera. This can be time-consuming, although we can do some sort of automation, but still, it takes some time to do this. The second thing, one important note when using SFR, the standard switch and some of the high availability features with Venter in the standard switch must be named. You have this naming convention, so your name should be common throughout the V SFA domain. And then also note that the features like input out network, I O, CTRL, LDP network, Health Check, and the backup and the store mean some advanced features. They are not supported by the standard switch. So these are the issues we have. And that's why we want to use the distributed virtual switch we'll see in upcoming sections.

9. VMware vSphere Port Group & vases

In this crucial section, we will look at VMware vSphere port groups. That's the port group and the standard switch, or the V switch. So, what is a port group and what is the significance of the port group? Now, in this section, we'll understand 100% about the port group and the standard switch. The next section will go on to perform the lap task. So what is happening? I'll give you an example. Suppose you have one VM on a virtual machine and it has the Vine. Now, likewise, you have another VM, say VM two. This is VM one and VM two. This has v nick. Now what you can do with these particular interfaces, virtual nicks, is connect with the port group. Now again, what is the port group? So port groups have common properties, and port groups have common policies. Assume these VMs are related to human resources. So you can go inside the port group and set common properties and common attributes, and when you associate different, different VMs to this particular port group, they are all part of the same port group. Okay? One interesting thing. Assume you are familiar with ACI application centricinfra within Cisco ACI, where we have the concept of end point group EPG. So let's suppose if you create a VMM domain and then go and create an endpoint group, this endpoint group inside ACI is equal to the port group as well.

Now, the concept of endpoint group also means you may have a common EPG. So, for example, EPG related to web, HR, or sales, etc. Those common EPGs are part of a port group or the port group is equivalent to the endpoint group. Okay? As a result, both VMware port group and Cisco endpoint group have evaluated their endpoint group. Both are actually common attributes, common properties. You can use common properties interfaces or interfaces that you are going to connect with the common properties. Those are nothing but the port group, right? So what's the definition here? Let's see the definition of V switch connectivity policy, which essentially defines how the virtual device handles traffic that belongs to a group of VMs. In the case of VMware, this policy is called a port group. So you have one group where you are collecting all the ports and this group has the policy that will be applicable to all the interfaces or all the ports connected inside this group like that. All right, so let's say I'll log into the device and I'll show you how we can select or deselect the port group with respect to this particular image that is here. You can see that this is the V switch. I will log in and I'll show you all the properties in six, seven, and eight vs.

client and you will find the display is a bit different, but the policies or the properties will be the same. We'll see that in the upcoming recording. As a result, they belong to, say, VLAN 10-5. Then you have the security policy, traffic shipping, and the timing if I go back into the slide. So let me go back to the slide. Here you can see that. Let me go back one slide back. So here you can see that your V switch has security policy, traffic, shipping failover policies, and Thelon tagged with that. We'll see that you have port group belonging to 100 and how we can go and connect all these things we'll see. For the time being, think of common properties as interfaces grouped within a group or common interfaces groups along with the port group's common policies and properties. I'll show you. I'll log into the VM,I'll go to the network adapter and that network adapter, I'll connect with the port group. This network adapter is nothing but a virtual interface. All right, so we have already discussed that once you have the standard switch, at that time you have issues.

What issues do you have? Assume you have the same type of port group on all hosts; you must go create those port groups on all hosts. So, host number one, host number two, and host number three. Suppose you have HR here as a standard switch. You have to create here, there, and everywhere. That's the problem, which means you can think like a Cisco access switch. All these VSA standard switches work as Cisco access switches. But again, all the access switches are going to be connected to the distributed switch. And that's the term that we'll see later on what the use case of the distributed switch is. I have a complete set of slides for that. We'll discuss that inside that. But for the operational efficiency to support new features, you need a distributed virtual switch. And inside that also, you can go and attach the port groups. So port groups belonging to distributed switch, we'll see later on. All right, in this section mainly, we are going to focus on the standard switch. So how can I go and add the standard switch? I'll go, and I'll show you all the steps. Now, there are multiple ways to create the standard switch. First of all, we'll go to the host and see if we have a standard switch already. If not, then we'll go ahead and add that. This is one of the ways, but we have multiple ways. I'll show you different ways to go and add the network. So you can add the network by right-clicking on the host. Once you go inside that, you'll find what you want to add. VM kernel, physical network adapter, or virtual machine port group for a standard switch. Now, the VM kernel, clearly you see that it belongs to Motion. So VSphere V motion is NFS, Foe, Ft, which is the fault tolerance and virtual fan. If you are creating the VM kernel, I will show you all these port interfaces, port group and switches, or the standard switch in the upcoming recording. Then you may have the physical network adapter.

A physical network adapter handles the network traffic to other hosts on the network. Then you have the standard switch, a standard switch, and then we have the group for a standard switch. We'll see that. So let's suppose you select the third option, then you'll get the option of whether you want the existing standard switch or the new standard switch. You can go ahead and add the adapters. You can click the unused adapter, click the plus sign, and you will get the option for the physical network adapter. You can use one adapter to adapt. Once you have one and two adapters, you can use this up and down arrow to set the different networking parameters or the properties of the adapters I will show you all these things, and finally you can see that this network has a network label and the VLAN at the moment is untagged VLAN zero.

That's it. So this way, we can create the standard switch. Now suppose you want to go and edit something. I'll log in and I'll show you that you can edit the V switch. Also, obviously, you select the V switch. You have the principle button here for the edit. You can go and edit, so you can go and change the properties. For example, If I go and select it, it asks about the MTU. What's the security policy? What's the traffic shipping We have all those things we can go and select one by one, but just for knowledge purposes, we are studying that okay, we have the standard switch option or we switch option, but later and in general, we are using the distributed virtual switch, so this is also an option we have that we can go and check. Likewise, in the next section, in the last section, I'll go there and I'll show you that you can go and select the physical adapter as well, and this is the way I'm going to show you. So I'll start with the dashboard and then move on to the Six.

Once you go there, you have this networking option, so you can go and check the virtual switch, VM kernel adapters, physical adapters, and TCP IP configuration. Once you're inside the physical adapter, here you can see you have the add network options. You can go and check all these things. I will show you one by one all these operations. So, what is the takeaway from this section? The takeaway is, what is a port group? Regardless of whether you use a virtual switch or a distributed virtual switch, you should understand what a port group is.

The significance of port groups is that they mean you're going to connect interfaces or vein interfaces that have common attribute properties with the same type of port group. Once you have the port group, that's the first thing that we study. The second thing we are going to study, or we have a study so far, or we have seen the slides, is how to create the standard switch. And then again, a few of the slides you can see. That's how you can go and edit the physical adapter as well, all these things. When we see this in a lab, then we'll understand more than these slides. But still, these slides are just for your reference that you can go and you can do any type of change. Say, for example, if I understand the theory behind all these groups and the distributed virtual switch, then it's actually very easy and straightforward that we can use the GUI, and inside the GUI we can go and make all sorts of changes. correct? So here it shows how we can go and do the load balancing in between the physical adapters. say, for example, active, active or active standby, etc. Right, so let's just stop here and in the next section I'm going to show you the port group and the standard switch and we'll see how we can edit, create, and even delete.

10. vSwitch0 or Standard Switch Lab

Let us perform the lab task. So I want to make this particular video very clear so that you understand what the meaning of host is, what the meaning of physical interface is, and what the virtual or VM interface is. Assume I only have one host. In this case, we have host one and host two. Now here you should understand, I'll go ahead and log in. I'll show you all those things. Now, inside this host, a few of the interfaces will be physical interfaces. So I'll mark this as a physical interface. We'll see both the hosts have their own indivisible physical interfaces. We'll see what the physical interface is for these guys. They have their V switch. These guys have their DVS. Now DVS will be common for all the hosts, right? And that's the use of DBS DVS having global view for all the hosts and the networking. But for these hosts, they may have their own local switch. So VSS. For example, vs. VSU.

Again, where we will use the port groups, where we will use the port groups, is very important. Let's just understand all these things. So let me go to the host and cluster inside the host and cluster. If I go, let me walk you through all these things. So I'm inside, say host one, and if I go and click, for example, you have configured. So first of all, let's start with configuration. Inside configuration, you can see the networking tab here. Inside networking, you have a virtual switch. So what type of switch do I have inside Six or the host virtual switch? Kernel adapter, physical adapter, and TCP IP configuration. Now this VM kernel adapter thinks this is related to control plane traffic. Control the flow of planes. This physical adapter that is going outside—this is nothing but an uplink, correct? Control plane traffic. It is going out like that. You have to think now, so you have the host, you have the control plane adapters, you have the uplink, and then you have the virtual switch where you connect your VM interfaces or VM nick. We'll see, we're telling vein, and we have one diagram, which we'll check. So we have V nick, virtual Linux in VM, and we're connecting to the virtual switch. Now, this virtual switch could be an atypical switch or a distributed virtual switch, correct?

So let me go and show you that. So I will go here and click the virtual switch. Once I click that, you can see inside virtual switch you have two categories of switch. One example is this distributed virtual switch. The other category is standard switches. That is the V switch. Now on the top you have the option to add network and add those switches you'll see later on. But because this particular section is focused on standard switches, we'll explore that. But suppose if I go and click this distributed switch, let me expand this now. Here you can see that this particular virtual switch is connected to different types of network interfaces. So we have the Six reason. It's just the name belonging to the VM kernel. This is not attached to any VM. So you have various networking and telecommunication interfaces, and you can think of these networking interfaces as nothing more than a port group, right? So here you can see that you have one of the port groups that is nothing but Reason VDS, just a name. It is attached to one of the virtual machines that is Windows Ten, correct? Now you can clearly see that this Windows machine is a member of the port group or the networking, as they have their vinyl connected here and pinned to two uplinks. These uplinks can perform nick, timing, load balancing, and so on. There are many features that we can achieve with the grouping of uplinks, but this uplink is within one of the networks; they are part of uplink region one network. So you have 1234 and five different types of networks inside this particular distributed virtual switch, and the name of this particular distributed virtual switch is nothing but a zero VDS comp. So before showing you this section that is the standard switch, I want to show you one very important thing. So if I go ahead and click networking, either you can go ahead and click there or you can go to the menu and click here. You have this networking, either way is fine.

So once you are inside the network, you can see that you have the switch. This is the DBS switch inside that you have the groups, correct? So inside that, you can see that you have different different network. This is one way to see this. You can see the distributed switch. This is actually the port group network. You have some uplink. So Uplink has to host this switch, and this switch is combined or can be combined with multiple hosts or the Six, correct? Now let's go back. We'll go to the cluster here and inside the host again. I want to show you some other things. Suppose I'm jumping ahead of the time, suppose this place if I go and click network. You can see here the network, so you can see you have the network distributed port group. You can seed the port group. Then you have the uplink port group. Then you have the standard network. You'll also see this. What does it belong to? One of the VMs is a member of this specific standard network, which belongs to our switch; our standard switch has a distributed port group, so you have port groups, uplink port groups, and one VM network. I can also think of this as a port group at the moment. It's like this. Now, before moving further, let's quickly check the V switch because I'm very much interested in the V switch. I'll go to host configuration and the Switch, and let's see the standard V switch. So now you have on a standard V switch, you can see one uplink and one of the Vim. So one venin was connected with one uplink. This is nothing but tiny Linux. correct?

If you want to see more details about this, you can go and check the Mac address adapter type. You can go and check the properties related to that. All these properties we'll discuss in the upcoming section. But what are the things you can do with your standard switch? Now you can use the security features like promiscuous, Mac address changes, and force transmit by default. You can see this is the default traffic shaping option we can do. We have the Nick team. At the moment, only Nick is there. As a result, there will be no load balancing or teaming. Correct. So here you can clearly see that you have your own host one. This is my host one. Say, host one. Let me write it one more time. Host one. This host has DVS, but this has a V switch as well. Now this V switch and, obviously, you have a VM as well. One of the VMs' names is Tiny Linux. One of the VMs' ports, which is nothing more than a voice, is linked to the V switch zero, as well as one of the uplinks. The uplink is nothing but VM nick two. Okay, so first of all, let's see that this particular guy, this particular host, has how many uplinks? So if you want to see this, you have to go here to the physical adapter. You can see that it has zero, one, two, and three. This too is connected to this particular access switch. For the moment, I'll give the name access switch.

So this is your standard switch or access switch. There you can see two other niches, say for example, the physical link, say VM Nick zero and VM Nick one. They are linked to these shady characters. So they are connected by DVS. But still, I have one vein that is called VM Three that is not assigned anywhere. So what I will do is go and attach this guy here. Okay, so let's do this operation. I'll go and attach this leftover Vine to the standard switch, and then we can do certain operations. correct? But at the moment, I think that you are able to understand how this local switching or access or the standard switch and DB are how this local So here you can see you have this option to add the network, but I'll go to this switch. If I'm here in the virtual switch, I can click "add network." When you're adding the network again, You can see now we are going in depth again. You can see you have the option to create a VM kernel network adapter that is related to controlling traffic such as Motion iskg NFSFCE fault tolerance and host management The other thing is you have the virtual machine port group for a standard switch. You have the physical network adapter because I am focused on the virtual switch, so I'll do one thing So, suppose you want to create a new standard, you have the option here to use the existing, so I can go and use this sky V switch zero, which is my existing switch, and then I'll go next to the network label. I'll leave this as default. I'll leave this VLAN ID as default. I'll click next ready to complete and finish.

Now you can see first of all, what I have shown you here is that I simply went on and added the extra network here, so I have added VM network and then VM network too. This is nothing but a local port group. You can think this is a local port group local to this particular so once I have created this then what I will do here? I can access the tiny Linux here. If you go here, you can go ahead and you can click do right here. Or you can go to the configuration also, so tiny Linux and configure. I think in configure also you should get the option to add the VM, but we are not getting it here configuration Keep in mind that there are multiple ways to accomplish the same thing. Let me check action as well. If I get you can do like this, you can go to the action and click edit settings or you can right click here. You can go to the edit settings and now if you see here, you can see here So let me go back to the network.

First of all, you can see that it is connected with network two, so let me go back one more time because I want to add a new device. Okay, I'll roll back to the VM network first. This will be the local switch, and then add a new device. I will add network number two. So now what is happening? We can go and check the task as well, so we have successfully added an extra network. Now when we are talking about these networks, we'll see later on that they do not have the standard switch because we are not going to do many things in the standard with respect to a standard witch. Whenever you see the production network, you will find only distributed virtual switches and those are heavily used. So I'm not putting much effort into this. But still, you can see that you can go and add the standard network. So if I go down here, you can see that. Now inside that, we have two networks here. What about adding a physical network adapter? So let me go and add the physical adapter as well. Let's do this. I'll go to the physical adapter. I have one of the physical adapters that is unused. I can click this. I can click Edit, and let's see Edit. I can simply change the speed and flex. But I'll do one thing. I'll add the network physical adapter. Let's add the physical adapter now and the physical adapter with the existing switch. I have this V switch. Okay, we'll go next. Let's see if I have any unused yet. So I want to add these three voices there. So now you'll see that initially in the switch you have one uplink. Now you have added one more uplink.

And here's the trick. So what do you want? You want active standby or you want active like this. You can see all the properties, if you want to do the unused. So, for example, I want to be active. Active Then you can see you have all sorts of properties here. CDP, LLDP, all these options we have, we'll check this later on. But I can go next year and finish. So once I finish this now, you can see these two physical interfaces. I'll go quickly back to the switch and inside the switch you can see two things. You can see how I have added the virtual nick and then added the interface inside the VM machine. And both the interfaces you can see here are part of the nick or the port group, and then the port group related to the physical interface. But it's a physical interface used as Active Active, so you have options. You can use this as an active standby as well. You can go and check the settings. So I hope you understand how we can do the operations related to networking. Now on the top, you can see manage physical adapters and add the network. So from here you also have the option. When you add the VM kernel for this specific switch, you have several options. So that option also means you have an existing standard switch if you are adding the VM kernel Name of the VM kernel What's the IPV for ads? What's the use of this?

The V motion or whatever the management interface is, automatically selecting IPV for address or having any address that you want to put in. You can put any subnet mask you want to put in. You have a default get all I'm just showing you for an example. Enter a valid subnet mask. So I'll do one thing. I'll give 24. We'll do this thing. We'll use this notation but it is not telling you in which format you have to put etcetera and finish. This will fail because this is the wrong address and all, but we can go and check the alarm and events as well. What errors are we getting while adding this particular VM? kind of like occurred during host configuration. We have an error because that IP does not exist on the other side. But I'm just showing you that from here also you can go and do the edit. So with respect to V switch, I can go and change the properties, I can go and change the security settings like Mac address changes for transmit, you'll see all these things later on. What does it mean? What is the overall example use of this and the definition of this? We'll see in the upcoming slides. As you can see, you have plenty of load balancing methods like IP based MacBook’s. fallback notify and the failover order. Then if you want to click manage, we can do up and down. So this is actually all the operations related to local switch and we are not using much, but it's good that we understand how we can add. So we're doing a number of operations related to this, but our main focus will be on distributed virtualization, so let's just stop here and learn more about virtual networking in the next section.

11. Port Group Properties

Let us discuss the port group properties. Here you can see that we have properties for security, traffic, shipping, and transportation and fail over options. When we are inside security, we have a promiscuous mode match and the force transmits and the order that we can select or the option to select is accept or reject. correct? So let's see one by one in the case of Promiscuous mode. If it is chosen as a reject, that means there is no effect. But if you accept this mode, that means you are detecting the frames with respect to whatever policy you have configured for that particular port group or for that particular adapter inside the port group. correct? So if it is accepted, that means you are detecting all the frames passing through the Vs via a standard switch. You can see the default setting here. The default will be like this. The Mac address change is accepted and the force transmitted is accepted. Accept So let's see what is there in the mac address.

Changes in Mac's address change. One thing to note here is that the V sphere that is inside the VMX configuration file where they are storing the Mac address. Suppose if they see any change in the Mac address, which means if you make this a reject, if there is any change in the Mac addresses, they will start dropping the traffic. Rather, if you make this an accepted means, that means in that case, they will allow those frames. So what is happening here? Changing the Mac address from the guest OS has the intended effect. Frames sent to the altered Mac address are received by the virtual machine. So even the Mac address change is there. The frames will be passed through force transmit. Reject means again, force means someone is doing some sort of spoofing in the case of Mac address. So here is what will happen. And this is again applied to the outbound frame. So any outbound frame with a source mac address that is different from the one currently set in the adapter is dropped. So while doing the transmission of the frames, it will see what the source Mac address is, what is set in the adapter, and if it is rejected, it will drop that. If it is accepted, it will allow that. So it depends on what security policies we have.

We can either accept or reject it. All right, traffic shipping. It's very much like the Cisco configuration, Cisco traffic shipping, or the QS configuration. What is happening here is that you have an average bandwidth and then you may have a certain peak bandwidth. So say peak, and then if you are going for some slice of time, if you are going a little bit up, then you have burst traffic. So these are the standard options within Cisco US as well. What is the standard? What is the peak bandwidth? And how much do you want to buffer in case of a burst? All right, then we have the important things, which is the load balancing option and the fail over in case of timing. So here you can see that we have multiple options. I think we have six load balancing options here. So let us see all those load balancing options one by one. So the first load balancing option here is based on the originating virtual port. Now what will happen is that the switch will select an uplink based on the virtual port ID on the switch. So, once they've decided on the uplink, they'll go with some sort of pinning option. You have two or three uplinks. You select one of the uplinks and you are sticking with that. That's the default load balancing option we have.

Then we have the route based IPhash and the Mac based IP hash. This is very much like if you are comparing this with the LACP port channel inswitch when we are creating the ether channel. So, at that time, they can do route-based, IP Mac waste, and IP MacBook address. There are also so many load balancing methods in case of LSCP and Dhcpo ethanol terms. You can see that you have route-based IP hash, which means you are checking the hashvalue of the source and the destination IP and then you're sending the frames over the uplink. The same thing with respect to Mac. Also, we have the loadbalancing option with respect to nick load. So suppose we have two nicks, one of which has a load of 30%, and the other half of 10% automatically shifts to the other nick. So this is also a nice feature. Then we have an explicit failover order according to the high interface number. Suppose this is number two, and this is number one. You're always pinned at number two. So what is happening? Let me read from the list of active adapters.

Always use the highest order uplink that passes the failover detection criteria and there is no load balancing performed in this option. Obviously, this is something like user defined. You can go ahead and define the load balancing method. So once we have the load balancing methods, then what options do we have? As you can see, we have network failure detection link status only or beacon related. Then you have notified switch and fallbacklinked status, which means it's very flat. If the link is up and down, it will tell us which particular link you are sending. The traffic is down. Use the other link. Then you have the beacon proving this is an intelligent way to detect the link status. So one, two, three, whatever number of links we have, we are sending the proofs every 1 second and checking that the link is up or not. And then if it is not up, obviously the traffic will go in some other direction, very much like we are doing in Cisco, but generally we try to check the ISP link. So, in Cisco, we have some sort of IPtracking SLA. So you're checking one link up to with respect to the other link, sending some sort of IPIC unreachable type of beacon approach, and you're checking if that link is up or not. If it is unreachable after every 1 second, you're sending the probes with, for example, a hold timer of three seconds or five seconds.

If it is not responding, you can go to the other direction and notify the switch. We have this option to specify where the virtual switchnotifies the physical switch in case of fail over. As a result, if any fail over occurs, the switch will be notified. And then finally, you have this failover option. This is also a very logical failover option. You have the fallback is set to yes, the fallback is set to no. So suppose you have two links and fall back to is set to yes. If this link is down, this will become active. Suppose this link comes back, this will become active standby in the case of active standby. So whatever the original state of the link was, once it gets recovered, it will start following the traffic, and that is not the case if the fallback is set to no. So what will happen is that two links are active standby. This link will become active or maybe active standby. So now he is the primary person who is sending the traffic. Now, suppose this link gets reinstalled, it will still send the traffic until something happens here, and then it will become active and send the traffic. So these are the failed fallback options we have and these are all the options we have inside the V switch. You can see that we still have multiple options related to security, traffic, shipping, teaming and fail over.

12. Introduction to Distributed Virtual Switch

This recording session is going to be very small. We are going to understand the distributed virtual switch. And now, suppose you see this diagram. Now this diagram is a little bit confusing, but let's come back to this diagram after this. So now, if you see this particular diagram, we can see that the distributedvirtual switch has host-wide visibility.

So all the hosts can connect with the distributed virtual switch. Despite the fact that these hosts have their own standard switch, you can see that they have VM kernel nicks and uplinks. There is nothing here that is a physical link. You can think of the VM nick as an uplink. They have a V nick, which is a VM hosted nick. So if I draw this diagram, you can understand that you have a guest operating system. This is simply the guests, which is hosted on the host. So you may have multiple guests. All these multiple guests, they may be part of this. We switch. As you can see, just as an example, it is shown like this and they may be part of DBS. But what is interesting and important to note here is that you have a VM colonel nick and you have a VM nick. You have v. Nick. So you have three different types of nicks. You have a management nickname, an uplink nickname, and a virtual machine nickname, correct?

And the difference here is that this distributed virtual switch has global visibility. So it will be visible to all the hosts. So here you can understand this diagram now. Let me change the color of my pin. Now, here you can see that you have the physical interfaces here. Now these physical interfaces are nothing but VM nicks. So you have VM nick one and VM nick two. Here you have VM nick one for this nick two for this particular host. Like that, you can think and you can see the uplink. Now you have the VM. So this particular VM, what is its name? This is nothing but Vine. So they are Vine. They are Vinci. They are Vinci. Now we have the distributed virtual switch. Here we have the port group A-B-C-D-E. As you can see in the diagram, assume this A belongs to HR. A is a placeholder for HR. So these two VMs belong to the HR group. So these two guest operating systems are, for example, HR Server One or HR server two. Okay? In general, we call these things things like web server one and web server two. Then you can see that you have and here it's showing like this. But you have VM with multiple V nicks. So here I have VM with two nicks. They are part of it. For example, this is app server one. Then you can see the other host inside the cluster. So it may be that all these hosts are part of DC cluster on the other hand, VM.

They have their own vein. This guy has the vine. They are part of one of the other port groups that is nothing but DB. So this VM's name is DB. I'll write DB server one. This is DB server two. So you can see that you can group all of those different VMs into the same type of port groups based on their attributes. And then you can apply certain rules and certain policies over the distributed virtual switch inside the port groups and those will be applicable to all these endpoints for all these VMs. So here you can see the endpoint is nothing but your virtual machine. So either the traffic is going from east to west or the traffic is going from south to north or north to south. But when it is going outside, it is leaving the cluster. When it is leaving the Vs, they are using the physical interfaces. So this is actually a very important analogy. I hope that you understand that. Please pause the recording and then you can check this definition. Whatever we have discussed so far, you’ll find the same thing here.

Prepared by Top Experts, the top IT Trainers ensure that when it comes to your IT exam prep and you can count on ExamSnap Implementing Cisco Enterprise Network Core Technologies (ENCOR) certification video training course that goes in line with the corresponding Cisco 350-401 exam dumps, study guide, and practice test questions & answers.

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Please post your comments about 350-401 Exams. Don't share your email address asking for 350-401 braindumps or 350-401 exam pdf files.

  • giaNNa
  • United Arab Emirates
  • Jan 03, 2023

I have enjoyed the CCNP Route Course because it is a great re-freshener towards the CCNP topics. it helps when the instructor is passionate about teaching, I highly recommend Laz to anyone interested in the course.

  • henry
  • Australia
  • Dec 20, 2022

the course covers the overall knowledge requirement. I feel the instructor could have spent a little more time explaining topics like BGP, VRF, IP SLA, NSSA, total stub areas and DMVPN.

  • RONG
  • United Kingdom
  • Dec 02, 2022

• I really like how the courses are delivered; straight to the point in a concise manner. The instructor does not seem to doubt what he teaches at all. He is concise of what he is doing.

  • persey
  • Switzerland
  • Nov 11, 2022

The methods used to teach are clear to understand and use relevant examples to make it easier to digest if it is a hard subject. I would recommend this course to anyone looking for getting into Networking. 10/10.

  • Anay
  • Puerto Rico
  • Oct 23, 2022

Lazaro, the instructor is by far one of the best I have had the pleasure to learn from. He is precise and to the point as well as he gives extra information to go above and beyond.

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