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Deploy and update operating systems

1. Understanding the deployments options in Windows 10

The first thing we have is what's called a fresh install. A fresh install is just sort of your normal way of doing things. You would get a copy of Windows 10 on a DVD or you could have a copy of it on a flashdrive and then you would pop that into a computer, boot it up, and then you would answer the questions that it's going to ask while it's being installed. After that's done, you boot the computer up and it does this thing called O-B-E (out of boxexperience) and you answer those questions, and it'll have Cortana the AI talking to you there. And then at that point, you've got Windows teninstalled and it's just a matter of installing all your software and getting all your updates on there. Now imagine that process. If you had to do this with 100 computers or ten computers, you could imagine that's a lot of work, right? So a fresh install is also referred to as a high-touch installation, which is HTI. Okay? Another way we can do things is through imaging. And I'd have to say that, as far as it goes, imaging is probably the traditional way of getting everything done. With imaging We're going to use some different tools that are going to help us automate this process of deploying Windows ten out there. Traditionally, we're going to use a package called Windows Eightyk, which is the Windows Assessment and Deployment Toolkit, which you can download on Microsoft's website. It used to be called Wake Waik, the Windows Automated Installation Kit, back in the earlier days, Windows Vista and early days of Windows Seven. And then they renamed it to Windows Eighty-K a little later. I only point that out just because sometimes you might be reading online and they might reference the older name for it. Okay, another tool that can be used with that is called MDT. That's the Microsoft Deployment Tool kit. This is a little graphical tool that kind of acts as a workbench for all of your imaging assets. You're going to be using this method to deploy windows Ten is known as a lighttouch installation or lighttouch deployment. Okay? Another thing you can do is you can do what's called a Zero Touch Deployment or zero touch installation.In order to do that, you have to have MDT and Sccm. That's the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit with Sid System CenterConfiguration Manager, which is a very powerful tool that can actually wake computers up, have the image deployed, and shut them down when it's done. Okay? an incredibly powerful way of doing things. Now what's the real difference between light touch and zero touch? Well, "light touch" is exactly what it sounds like. You will have to kind of put your hands on the keyboards. You've got to image the machine like a reference computer, and then you've got to deploy it down to your destination computers, and of course, that's going to require you to power the computer up and select the image you want and all of that fun stuff. whereas with Sccm you have these things called tasksequences that work in conjunction with the MDT, the Microsoft deployment toolkit, and they can automate every step that's needed to do the deployment. Okay? So this is why it is considered zero touch. Now I will also say there's another sort of zero-touch option, arguably, and that's called Windows Autopilot. Now we're going to spend a lot of time going over Autopilot here, coming up, because this is one of the newer things and definitely one of the things they want to hit you with on this exam, okay? Autopilot is not actually re-imaging your computer. Autopilot is doing what is called "reprovisioning" your computer. Okay? Here it is in a nutshell. You go out, you buy a bunch of computers from a company like Dell or HP or something. You put those in your environment, and then we normally blow the operating systems off the computer and then reimage, right? But with Autopilot, what we're going to do is we get these new computers, and Autopilot is going to reconfigure those operating systems. So if I buy 50 new computers from a company like Dell, Autopilot will take the copies of Windows Ten that are probably already on the operating system because you purchased them from Dell, and it's going to reconfigure those and redo the OOBE, the OutofBox experience as well. Once it's done that, it can hook into Microsoft's Mobile Device Management service, which is known as Intune, and it can actually configure everything that way,deploying apps, updates, and all that. We're going to talk a lot about Intune in this course as well. Coming up. Okay, so that's what Autopilot is in a nutshell. The final option is just called it in places. Upgrade. And in places, upgrade is where we're going to upgrade from an older operating system to the newer operating system. Okay? Windows ten. As far as upgrading Windows Ten goes, you can upgrade from Windows Seven to Windows Ten, and you can upgrade from Windows Eight or Eight One to Windows Ten. Unfortunately, you can't upgrade Vista or XP. God forbid. You've still got some XP in your environment, but you can upgrade directly from those. You'd have to get to either Windows Seven or Windows Eight and then upgrade. Granted, we'll also learn about migrations and you can migrate stuff from those older operating systems like Vista and XP and all that. Okay? So the next thing I want to talk about is Windows Eighty-five a little bit more. As a result, Windows Eightyk is a free download. You can go and download it from Microsoft's website. It comes with a bunch of tools. One of the tools that it comes with is called Act, the Application Compatibility Toolkit. This is a great tool. It will scan your environment and tell you if there are any incompatible applications. Imagine a scenario where you've got a bunch of Windows Seven computers or something that needs to be upgraded to Windows Ten. But you're worried that once you do upgrade to Windows Ten, it is going to make it so you no longer have the ability to use some of your older software that's on the computers already. So what this act will do is it will scan your existing environment. It will tell you if there are any older software packages on there that may not work on Windows Ten. The other thing that it can do is it can deploy these little things called 'Shims' that can actually update and fix some of the little problems that might arise once you get to Windows X. So it's definitely a handy little tool that you get. And again, it comes with windows. Eightyk. The next tool is the user state migration tool. This tool comes with two different commands that can help you migrate users' data. You have a command called Scan State which will allow you to back up your users' state that involves their profile settings or documents, pretty much everything that makes them unique on a machine. Because if you think about it like this, let's say users have an older computer, let's say they're running Windows Seven, you're getting rid of the old computer, they're getting a new computer, and the new computer has Windows Ten on it. Of course, the big fear that people are going to have is, "Oh no, I'm going to lose all my stuff. right? So the USMT is a tool that will back everything up using the Scan State utility, and then you can restore that all back to their computer using the Load State utility. And if you use that other tool I mentioned previously called MDT, Microsoft DeploymentToolkit, you can actually automate that process. Okay, this is a pretty neat method of taking care of things and very advanced. You can do a lot with it. The next tool is called DISM. This is the Deployment, Imaging, Servicing, and Management Tool. This is actually used to capture and deploy images. So if we're going to capture an image from, say, a reference computer, and we want to deploy that image to a bunch of other computers, DISM is going to be the tool that's going to make that happen. Okay? We've also got Vamp. This is a volume activation management tool. This is going to allow us to scan all the computers in our environment and see if they're activated and if there's anything that's not activated. And we can actually, from that console,that little graphical tool, we can remotely activate Windows computers that are not activated. We also have an ICD. That's the imaging and configuration designer. This is going to let you build little provisioning packages. If you've ever heard of an answer file, which is just like a text file that answers questions when a setup programme needs answers to some of the prompts, Essentially, that's what this is. ICD creates these little XML files, which are just text files, XML files that are called provisioning packages. And the provisioning packages can instruct your computer to reconfigure itself. Okay, so this goes back to the logic of maybe I don't want to reimage a computer, maybe I just want to reconfigure a computer. I can use these provisioning packages to do that. Okay, so the next thing is the UAV. This is user experience virtualization. If you've ever heard of roaming profiles, this is sort of a newer way of dealing with this sort of thing. With that sort of thing. The UAV is going to allow you to make it where users can move around to different Windows ten computers and their settings will follow them wherever they go. So imagine a user who configures Office on their computer and they make it look and feel exactly the way they like it. Everything's set up; their menu bars are set up a certain way. They could jump to another computer and those settings would go with them. Okay, so this is what theUEV is, user Experience Virtualization.We also have App V. This lets you do what's called "Application Virtualization," where you can package up an app into a single file. That single file can be encrypted and protected. And then what's cool about that is we can place that over on a server. Somebody could open a shortcut that pulls that file down and it will stream the file down to their computer while it's being streamed. So this pretty nice little feature has actually been around for a good bit of time now. A lot of people just haven't heard of it before. Then you've got the performance and assessment tools. These are just some extra tools that WindowsEightyk comes with that allow you to go through the process of looking at the analytics and performance metrics of a machine. So we have performance monitoring for all that. But you're going to get some performance recording tools that are going to assist you in gatheringperformance metrics on a Windows ten computer. Just make sure that you're getting the most bang for your buck out of your machines. Okay, then we got Windows PE. I want to point this out because a lot of people who have heard of Windows Eightyk before may remember the older versions came with Windows PE. They no longer come with windows.PE okay? You have to download that separately. Now, What is Windows? PE. Windows PE is the preinstallation environment. It's basically like a little command line version of Windows that is used for imaging. So a second ago I talked about how Disum is going to be used to allow me to capture an image and deploy an image. Well, the environment you're going to be in with Digim is going to be the Windows PE environment. So the Windows PE environment is what's going to let you run DISM and help you capture and deploy images. Okay, moving into this last little bit, we have the Microsoft deployment toolkit. Again, this is a free download from Microsoft's website as well. It does not come built into Windows 80K. Okay? But it is a free download. You go out there and get it. This is sort of like a deployment workbench that's going to let you handle and manage all your imaging assets all in one place. So as you can see here on the screen,I've got an Applications folder and an Operating Systems folder. I've got an out of box drivers folder. I got all this stuff in one place in one graphic that helps me manage it all. Okay? That's the one thing that can get crazy about dealing with images: there are so many tools and so many things you have to do. But this deployment workbench is sort of going to just keep everything all centrally in one place for you, so you can see all your images, you can see all your drivers, you can see all your applications that you want to be part of your images all in one spot. And it even has task sequences that are going to help automate the process of imaging. That gives you guys a good, nice little overview of the different tools, the Windows EightykMDT, and what an in-place upgrade is. a little bit on autopilot. We're going to talk a lot more about things like autopilot and intune and all that stuff coming up.

2. Traditional Image Deployment

I'd like now to go over the concept of a traditional deployment of Windows ten using imaging. Now, keep in mind the features and things that I'm about to show you here. These have been around for years. The actual concept of imaging has been around for a long, long time. Going back well over 20 years, One of the very first jobs I ever had was dealing with the imaging of computers back in the 1990s. This has been around for a while now. It's changed a lot over the years. And the version of imaging that we use in Windows Ten now has been around pretty much since Windows Vista came out. So this has been around for quite a while, and they've added some new features and capabilities to it. But all in all, it's really the same beast. It was just about back in the year 2008 when Vista came out. Okay, so to start with, our goal here is to have a way of capturing an existing computer's configuration settings, files, and transferring them all over to another computer. If you think about it like this, if I had to set up, I had to install 50 computers. Okay, let's say that this little icon that I'm drawing right here, here, is going to represent 50 new computers, okay? So if that's the case, these 50 new computers that I've got to set up and I've got to getconfigured and deployed and installed, sitting around, running around with a bunch of DVDs and things is, again, not going to be the fastest way to do it. Okay? So if our company was to buy new computers from some kind of an OEM out there, an original equipment manufacturer, vendor, or computer vendor, basically, I've got to get WindowsTen installed and set up on these machines. Now, how am I going to go about doing that? Okay, so one thing I could do is I could set up one of these computers with Windows 10 on it. I could configure all the software on it, in fact, and then capture an image of this computer. Assume this was a sales computer, and that each of the 50 new computers will be a new sales computer. Okay? Now, we'll also say that perhaps this particular computer is an inside sales computer. We're going to have outside sales, so you know how companies will have inside sales,they'll have outside sales, all of that. all right? So this is an inside sales computer that I'm dealing with here, and I'm going to call this my reference computer. all right? So this is going to be a reference computer. It has everything on it that I need. It's got Windows 10 set up the way I want it and it's got updates. Maybe it's joined to the domain already. I've got everything on virus protection,spiral protection, maybe office is already installed. But the problem is, I've got to get this setup here, replicated down to all these new machines. Okay? So here is the way Microsoft traditionally says you should do it. Microsoft says you should set up the server like a Windows Server 2019 machine. It could be something earlier than that, like 16, 20, 12, whatever. And you're going to install a service on that machine called WDS, also referred to as Windows DS, which stands for Windows Deployment Services. And this server is going to act as our imaging server. So we're going to use this as our imaging server that's going to help us with this process. Now, you're also going to install theMDT on that, the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit. Granted, you can install the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit on Windows Ten if you want, but you can put it on the WDS server as well. If you're going to be remoting in and managing that machine as the imaging machine, you can do that. Okay? all right? And so from there, we also have a service that automatically comes with Windows Deployment Services. It's called Pixie, which stands for pre-boot execution environment. OK? So, chances are, if you bought a network adapter card or bought a computer with a network adapter card already installed, that network adapter card probably supports Pixie. Pixie has been around for a long time, and a lot of your network adapter cards in the last 20 years have come with it. What does it let you do? A Pixie allows a computer to boot up across the network. Even if it does not have an existing operating system, the computer can boot up and using the BIOS UEFI settings of the boot phase of the computer, it can actually boot off the network adapter card and it can locate that Pixie service, which is going to play a role in imaging. So here's the other thing I want to throw out. An installed version of Windows ten is already an image of your computer, just so you know. You may say, "Well, wait a minute, because I installed Windows ten off of a DVD, it's not an image. Yes, it is. Actually, everything is an image. Ever since Vista came out, every operating system of Windows is an image, okay? In fact, you have a file on the WindowsDVD which is called the "install wim file." That installed wim file is an image. Essentially, this is called an online image, okay? You may say, "Wait a minute, what if I shut this computer down?" Is it still an online image? Yes, it's still an online image. A version of Windows that is installed is an online image. Whether it's booted up or not, it's an online image. And you may say, well, what is an offline image? Well, bear with me and I'll explain that in just a second, okay? Okay, so I need to have a way to essentially capture this image and store it on this image. servers There's got to be a way to go about doing that. And as you can imagine, there it is. We have this thing we can call the Windows PE preinstallation environment. The trick, though, is that you have to get Windows PE running on this computer. Now, how can you do that? Well, you can actually do that with Pixie. You can boot this computer up in Pixiemode, which will boot up and find this service. This service will download Windows PE into memory on this computer, and then you can capture the image. OK? Another way is that you could have PE on a DVD. There even used to be versions of it that would fit on a CD. Finally, another option is to use a USB drive with Pixie installed on it. You can get Windows, I'm sorry, with PE installed on it. You can get Windows PE off Microsoft's website. It's a download for free download.Windows PE is going to come with a tool called DISM.DISM dot exe. There used to be an older tool called Imagex that you would use. But DISM is the newer tool that came out a few years ago. Deployment Imaging, Servicing, and Management is what that stands for. And you're going to use thattool to actually capture the image. That command is going to capture the image, and it can store this image down on the server. OK, so at that point, I have an image file I can call the image file Sales Whim. Now that is an offline image. This is an offline image file you're seeing here. Okay, Offline image file Let me just move this over a little bit. OK? And so an offline image is an image that's actually stored in a whim file. Okay, In this case, it was a sales whim. All right. Now actually, interestingly enough, you're going to find that every image inside of an image file has to have a name, and it also has to have this thing called an index number. So I'm going to name the image that's going to be in this file. It's going to be called Inside Sales and it'll have an index number of one. OK? Now you may say, "Well, why do you need that?" Why do you have to have the name and the index inside the image? Well, the reason is that, believe it or not, you can store more than one image inside of an image file. That sounds insane, right? But you can. In fact, let me demonstrate here in this drawing what I'm saying. Watch this. I'm just going to copy that real quick and I'm going to rename this. It's not going to be called Inside Sales. This is going to be called "Outside Sales." So imagine if you set up another reference image here, an outside sales computer, and it's slightly different than Inside Sales.It needs slightly different applications and things like that. So, believe it or not, we could capture that image the exact same way that we captured the first image. We use Windows PE to capture the image, except this time we're going to store it in the same file, but it's going to be called outsidesales and it'll be an index number of two. Now, why is that important? Because when I go to deploy the image here, I can choose which image getsdeployed to these 50 new computers. If I wanted to, I could have 25 of the computers be inside sales and the other 25 be outside sales if I wanted to. So that is going to be deploying the image. Okay? And it works the same way. You're going to use Windows PE, you're going to useisim, same thing, Dissim Exe to deploy those images. Now, what you're seeing here, this is called the light touch installation, as Ireferenced in an earlier lecture, okay? But you could also achieve zero touch if your company were to set up what is called an Sccm Server. Sccm System Center Configuration Manager supports a feature called "Wake on Land," and it will also use some of the MDT task sequences and all of that. And it can automate the entire process of deployment, capturing, and deployment. So I can actually, with Sccm, I can actually have these computers wake up and tell them to go get the image from the WDS server and what image to get and everything else and basically automate the entire process from start to finish. So, again, no kidding. You could start on a Friday. You could schedule this to happen With the help of Sccm, you could come back on Monday and these 50 new computers are all setup for you with the help of Sccm.Again, in order to do that, you've got to have the deployment services and MDT, and Sccm is the critical part. And remember that Sccm is not free. You would have to purchase that, okay? So hopefully that gives you a good understanding, or at least a foundational understanding, of how Microsoft Imaging works and the process of light touch versus zero touch deployment.

3. Managing Provisioning Packages

Once that's open, it's going to look like this on your screen, and you're going to notice that you have these different boxes that are available to you. And I want to remind you what the aprovisioning package is before we go any further. The Provisioning package is a small file. It's an XML file. And this XML file can contain configurations that we want to change on people's machines. We want to reconfigure people's machines. OK? So the idea is that a lot of times, it's kind of funny when you think about it. We talk about imaging and the logic has always been when we buy a bunch of new computers in our environment, maybe from an OEM like Dell or HP or something like that, we then blow away the operating system that's there and then we reimage. We blow away what's there and we reimage. Of course, Microsoft is thinking in terms of a modern approach, and this is part of the modern desktop logic, okay? Why not reconfigure the existing operating system instead of destroying it? It's sort of like this. Imagine walking into a room and you don't like the way the room looks. You don't like the way it's decorated. You don't like the furniture. The paint on the walls. The lamp that's in the room. So what you do is you take a wrecking ball and you knock the entire room down. You scrap it away, throw it in the dump, and then you rebuild the room and put the furnishings in there. You want a better couch, another lamp, entertainment center, new paint, OK? That's sort of what we do with imaging. We bought a bunch of computers. A lot of these computers come with Windows 10. Then we blow away the existing copyright of Windows Ten on the hard drive and reimage. We basically reinstalled a new copy of Windows on there. But Microsoft's modern approach to all this is, hey, why not just redecorate? Why not just remove what you don't want? I know you may buy something from Dell or HP and they may have a bunch of software on there you don't want, but provisioning packages will let you remove that stuff. It'll let you reconfigure things. I can configure things like VPNs on people's machines and I can configure WiFi settings. You can create one provisioning package that contains hundreds of things, or you can create a bunch of little provisioning packages that can bedeployed to your machines and they're separated into different types of things you want. OK? So right here, these little buttons, you're going to see these little magic wands. These are wizards, right? They're going to walk you through how to create a provisioning package. I've got a provisioning package for desktops for the Microsoft Surface Hub. That's the tablets and all that. You have the HoloLens, which is their augmented reality technology. You can deploy them for kiosks, OK? which are computers that are sort of out in public that need a little bit more security. You have mobile devices, all that you can do. Advanced Okay, we'll start with the provision desktop option and then we're going to switch to Advanced so you can see everything. Okay? So I'm going to go provision a desktop device. It's going to ask me to give the provisioning package a name. I'm going to call it, let's say, VPN Settings, maybe. I'm wanting to configure Adesktop and have VPN settings. So then I'm going to click "finish. all right? So at that point, it's going to load up this little desktop wizard, and the desktop wizard is going to try to walk me through the things that I want. So it's a nice little wizard that sort of goes step-by-step, configuring the device name the way you want, so it'll change the computer's name if you deploy it. You can put the product key in here if you want. Okay, You can configure the network settings on somebody's machine. This will let you tap into wireless WiFi. You've got account management where you can configure an admin account on the machine or have it linked to the domain. You have applications here that I can add. I can install applications if I want, and then I can even add digital certificates to the machine, which gives it security. Okay? And then at that point, I could click Finishand it would help me build this provisioning package. But I want to show you more. So look down here at the bottom and I've got an option that says Switch to Advanced Editors. I'm going to click that, click yes. And let me zoom in a little bit on this for you, so you can see this a little bit better. So this is what it looks like when you get into this advanced mode. Move this down a little bit. When you first get into this advanced mode, you're like, "This is Advanced Mode." There's not much going on. But if you expand out, run time, you're going to see a lot of things here that you can configure, including a little search engine that will let you search for things. So in my case, I mean, look at all this stuff that I could do. If I was going to do say, VPN and all that, then I've got this thing called Connectivity Profiles and I could configure people's email, their exchange environment. I've got a VPN right here, which would let me actually configure the VPN settings on somebody's machine, which is what I had sort of mentioned a second ago. So if I wanted to, I could specify the VPNprofile types, VPN protocol, and call I wanted to use. And I could configure MTU settings if you know what that is. That's sort of the networking thing. Maximum transmission unit, VPN profile name. The point being, I can go in here and I can reconfigure all this stuff the way I want it and set up a VPN. I could configure wireless settings here if I wanted. Okay, have the SSID set up and the password set up. I also have this thing called WiFi, which allows Windows to share the WiFi password with other machines. I can configure all of that stuff here. There are so many things that you can set up here. Okay, I encourage you to install this on your own computer and then go in there and pick around at some of the things you can do, because there's a lot you can do. Now, once I've got it the way I want it, I can click Export Provisioning Package and then I can even assign a version and a priority ranking and all of that stuff to it. But from there I could even encrypt the package, which maybe you want to do if it's got some kind of like an admin password or something in it. You can digitally sign the package as well to provide authenticity to it's integrity. But you do have to specify a digital certificate if you're going to do that. I'm going to click Next, and I'm going to save this to my desktop. So I'll click Browse and we're just going to put it right here on my desktop. I'm just going to call it VPN Settings. Okay? Notice how the extension is a ppkg. It's important for you to know if you're taking the exam. The extension for provisioning packages is ppkg. Okay? So we're going to click Next, and we're going to click Build, and it's now building the package. And then it says that the package is located on my desktop. So I'm kind of zooming out here. If you look closely, you'll see it's right here on my desktop. I'll move it over here.

4. Evaluate deployment options in Microsoft Endpoint Manager

I'd like to now introduce you guys to something that's a relatively new feature that's been added to the Microsoft Cloud Services. This is called the Microsoft Endpoint Manager. Some people refer to it as mem. And what this tool does is connect two major products that Microsoft currently uses in their cloud and on-premise environments. Okay? So a lot of you guys may be aware that there's a product called Sccm System Center Configuration Manager. And this is a very powerful product used to deploy images and all that. You might have heard me mention that a little earlier, okay? As well, there is a product called Intune. Intune is a Microsoft MDM product which stands for Mobile Device Management. Well, here's the thing. Sccm, which has its roots all the way back into the 90s when it used to be called SMS, is an incredibly powerful product for dealing with images, deploying software, doing inventory, generating reports, and doing updates. Sccm always lacked in one area: it wasn't very powerful when it came to dealing with mobile devices, such as laptops, which moved around. I mean, don't get me wrong, you can manage laptops with Sccm, but it is a little bit trickier. On the other hand, a few years ago, they came up with a product called Intune. Intune is the mobile device management product. The thing is, with Intune, its strong point was managing devices that move around a lot. Mobile devices, laptops, smartphones,tablets, all that. Well, if you combine the two powers together,you get an extremely powerful product, right? So about a year ago, in 2019, Microsoft announced, "Okay, hey, we're going to combine these together." We're going to make this one main product that you can control all in one place. Now don't get me wrong, we still have Sccm,but they're now wanting to call it an Endpoint ConfigurationManager and we have Intune as well. But here's the thing: We can connect the two together in what we call a co-managed environment where we have an off-prem solution in our Microsoft domains that can configure all the on-premise stuff. And then we've got this cloud solution with Intune and we connect together both of those products so we have a centralised way to manage them. And the product that does that is called Microsoft Endpoint Manager. Okay? What's great about this is that if you get Sccm, you get the licence Intune. If you get in tune, you get the licenseSCM, or what they're now calling Endpoint Configuration Manager. So here I am on the portal, which is called Endpoint Microsoft.com. Okay? So, if you open your Microsoft CloudServices or Azure subscription, you can enter that and come here. And here it is. We're going to look at this a good bit during the course. This is sort of like your introduction to it. Okay, so what I want to talk to you about, though, is what our deployment options are involving the Endpoint Manager. We're going to revisit this. We're going to look at how you can deploy applications and configure the clients and deploy policies. There is an incredible amount you can do here, okay? But if we come over here to this little device's blade, that's what these little guys are called, blades. All right. You can see a bunch of different options here that I've got. So if I wanted to work with deployment, with provisioning and reconfiguring Windows, I would obviously choose the Windows platform here. Notice, though, I've also got the ability to do some configuration and provisioning with iOS, iPad,Mac OS, Android, and all that good stuff, okay? But the main thing I want to focus on right here during this little discussion is enrolling devices. So I'm going to click on that, all right? And look at my options I've got right here. So first off, I've got Windows enrollment. And this is where we're really thinking in terms of if I'm going to deploy Windows Ten, windowsenrollment is going to be the starting point. So with Windows enrollment, I can have devices enrolled in Windows Ten, and then I can go down the path of doing deployment. The big feature here that we can do in terms of deployment with Windows Ten is this guy right here,Windows Autopilot, which is going to be coming up in one of my next few lectures here. We're going to spend a lot of time talking about Autopilot. I'm going to get into the ins and outs of all of that, and we're going to spend a good bit of time making sure you guys understand all that. But this is one of our main provisioning systems that we can utilise with the EndPoint Manager, which ties to Intune on this. All right, what it's going to let me do is have a Windows ten machine that boots up, links to the cloud,and then we can reconfigure it any way we want. We can remove stuff, add stuff, deploy apps, deploy updates,configure policies on it all source of fun stuff.Okay, we've also got Apple enrollment as well. We'll spend some more time on this later, but I can link Apple devices to this. And there's a programme we can join called the DeviceEnrollment Program, which I'm going to tell you more about later, but I'll give it to you in a nutshell. The Depress enrollment programme allows you to purchase Apple devices, and you can have those devices automatically linked to the cloud and have them reconfigured through here by configuring policies and applications that you want to deploy. All that good stuff. We've also got Android enrollment, which is kind of the same thing here. So, with Android enrollment, we can set up a Google Play account. We can go in there. We can actually purchase devices, have them linked here, and then we can control those Android devices. And don't get me wrong, you also have the capability of having people BYOD (bring their own device) and having us control that as well. Okay, there are quite a few things here we can do. all right? And I'm going to expand on that as we get a little deeper. We're just sort of overviewing some of these deployment options here. I can even set enrollment restrictions so I can control how many devices can be enrolled and utilised by a certain person. Okay? We've got corporate device identifiers that identify our company and our users that are using their devices. And then there's this thing called device enrollment. Manager I'll tell you more about that a little later as well. In a nutshell, what that's going to do is that it's going to allow me to assign this job to a user, and this person can actually enrol devices on behalf of other users. So imagine you've got maybe a junior level admin and when people get hired they create an account and then they want to link devices into our cloud so that we can control them. This is the place that you're going to do that. Okay? So, hopefully, that gives you a quick overview of what Microsoft Endpoint Manager is and how it works with SCCM and Intune to connect the two. This is sort of your all-in-one one-stop shop for all your Sccm Intune needs if you're using both of those products together, okay? If you're not using both of those products together,you don't link them together, then this is mostly going to help manage in tune. Although Intune does have its own little portal that we're going to look at a little later as well. OK? So if that gives you a little bit of an understanding of all of that, we're going to be talking a lot more about this. This was mostly just meant to be sort of an overview to help you get moving with this stuff.

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